U.S. Seniors Still Choosing Psychiatry; Matches to PGY-2 Residencies on Decline

By Silverman, Jennifer | Clinical Psychiatry News, April 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

U.S. Seniors Still Choosing Psychiatry; Matches to PGY-2 Residencies on Decline


Silverman, Jennifer, Clinical Psychiatry News


The allure of a developing field and flexible schedule continues to attract U.S. medical school seniors to residencies in psychiatry.

The National Resident Matching Program reported that a total of 697 U.S. seniors matched to residency positions for the following programs in 2005: general psychiatry; medicine-psychiatry (internal medicine); the "triple board" pediatric/psychiatry/child psychiatry category; the psychiatry subcategories of child psychiatry, family practice and neurology; and the postgraduate year 2 (PGY-2) programs.

This represents a gain of 11 U.S. seniors from 2004--and 131 from 2000, when only 566 U.S. seniors filled positions in all of these programs.

"From 1997 to today, we've seen about a 50% increase in U.S. medical school seniors choosing psychiatry," Deborah J. Hales, M.D., director of the division of education with the American Psychiatric Association, told this newspaper.

Several factors account for psychiatry's popularity, Dr. Hales said. "First, there's lots of excitement in the area of neuroscience, which is creating new and more effective treatments for our patients." Psychiatrists also have lots of control over their schedules, an attraction for the young physician.

Humanism is a third factor. "We're the physicians who spend the most time talking to our patients," she said.

Overall, the psychiatry categories filled 1,035 positions this year, 4 more than last. General psychiatry did well once again, filling 653 slots with U.S. seniors, 12 more than last year.

On the decline are the numbers of graduating students matching to PGY-2 residencies, where students do 1 year of preliminary work in another discipline, then finish out their residency in clinical psychiatry.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

U.S. Seniors Still Choosing Psychiatry; Matches to PGY-2 Residencies on Decline
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?