Robert Winston Is a Leader in the Field of Human Fertility Research and the Presenter of Several TV Programmes, Including Human Mind and Child of Our Time. He Also Acted as Editorial Consultant on Human, Dorling Kindersley's Definitive Visual Guide to Our Species, Released Earlier This Year

By Sargent, Jo | Geographical, May 2005 | Go to article overview

Robert Winston Is a Leader in the Field of Human Fertility Research and the Presenter of Several TV Programmes, Including Human Mind and Child of Our Time. He Also Acted as Editorial Consultant on Human, Dorling Kindersley's Definitive Visual Guide to Our Species, Released Earlier This Year


Sargent, Jo, Geographical


How did you get involved in Human?

It's an area that I suppose is appropriate for me because of my broad interest in human biology, and I think the fact that it examines anthropology is very interesting. To put our humanity in a broader context was useful. I think it gives a wider appeal and will be more helpful for teaching young people, not only about human diversity, but also the nature of humanity.

Do you think we're becoming more culturally uniform?

Of course we are, aren't we? It's inevitable. I think there were 250 languages when last recorded, and up until the last century, there were at least four or five in the UK. Now, there's probably only two left. I don't think we can expect to see Cornish again. I think, inevitably, with mass communication, what we lose are some of those cultural diversities, because we now have an almost universal language. It isn't entirely negative, but now people in Shanghai watch the same films and television programmes as do people in Cardiff.

What do you feel is the most interesting aspect of the human animal?

Falling in love. That's an extraordinary and muddling experience. There are neurotransmitters that cause phenomenal effects--loss of appetites, night sweats, nightmares, sleeplessness. Another one, I think, would be lying. It's extraordinary, because lying turns out to be necessary. To be a successful human, even as a child, you need to know how to lie, and children who lie well tend

to be more gifted than children who don't, which is kind of curious. I suppose the biggest single aspect of human behaviour, which is both puzzling and difficult to probe, is spirituality. I mean, where does our spirit actually come from? Is it genetically determined? I think that religion and spirituality are fascinating aspects of human behaviour, because they can't be explored scientifically; we don't have the tools yet. But maybe we will in time.

Given the problems of overpopulation, how do you justify using science to help people reproduce?

That's a really silly question! You have six-point-something billion people in the world, and by the year 2025, there'll be maybe nine billion. But out of all the babies that are born, those born using fertility treatment add up to about a million.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Robert Winston Is a Leader in the Field of Human Fertility Research and the Presenter of Several TV Programmes, Including Human Mind and Child of Our Time. He Also Acted as Editorial Consultant on Human, Dorling Kindersley's Definitive Visual Guide to Our Species, Released Earlier This Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.