American Crime Prevention: Trends and New Frontiers

By Schuck, Amie M. | Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, April 2005 | Go to article overview

American Crime Prevention: Trends and New Frontiers


Schuck, Amie M., Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice


La prevention du crime est a la croisee des chemins aux Etats-Unis. Apres des decennies d'efforts couronnes de succes, la prevention est entree dans les moeurs en Amerique, et les strategies de prevention commencent a faire partie integrante des politiques gouvernementales. Neanmoins, il reste encore beaucoup d'incertitude relativement a la forme, au fonctionnement et au contenu des programmes de prevention. Dans le passe, les initiatives de prevention misaient sur les techniques de surveillance et de neutralisation, et privilegiaient essentiellement la lutte contre les armes, les gangs et les drogues. Au cours des dix dernieres annees, des formes de prevention plus novatrices ont ete incorporees dans les politiques publiques. Toutefois, le conservatisme ambiant, combine a la peur du terrorisme et a la rarefaction des sources de revenu, favorise le retour a la surveillance et a la neutralisation. Comme il n'y a pas d'organisme responsable en propre de la prevention du crime aux Etats-Unis, ni meme un programme national de lutte contre le crime, l'action en la matiere se fait au coup par coup dans ce pays. A l'heure actuelle, les themes qui dominent le discours americain sur la prevention du crime sont ceux des systemes d'integration de l'information et de la technologie de prevention, des partenariats entre organismes charges de l'application de la loi, des interventions ciblees. En revanche, il est peu probable que les tendances actuelles de la criminalite se maintiennent. Malgre les quantites impressionnantes de donnees probantes accumulees ces dernieres decennies a l'appui de l'utilite des initiatives de prevention du crime, les pressions en faveur du retour a la logique desuete de la dissuasion et de la punition sont encore enormes.)

Introduction

As Americans looks forward in the twenty-first century, the future is filled with considerable uncertainty. The war in the Middle East, the fear of terrorism, the fragile economy, the outsourcing of American jobs, and the rising costs of health care dominate public discourse. For the first time in 10 years, crime is not among the top concerns of the American people. This change is not surprising, given that Americans have witnessed a major national decline in crime over the past several decades. Violent crime, violence in families, violence among youth, and property crime have all decreased dramatically. In fact, 2002 violent crime rates were among the lowest ever recorded by the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) (Bureau of Justice Statistics 2003), and property crime rates were half of what they were 20 years ago and even lower than those reported by some Western European countries and Australia (Federal Bureau of Investigation 2002).

Although there is some disagreement about what has caused the dramatic decline in crime, most agree that specific crime reduction policies, such as policing initiatives, increased incarceration, gun control tactics, and youth substance abuse and violence prevention strategies, have played a significant role (Travis and Waul 2002). The impact and importance of crime prevention efforts are now being recognized. Research conducted by several scholars, including research on promising crime prevention practices by Lawrence Sherman (Sherman, Gottfredson, MacKenzie, Eck, Reuter, and Bushway 1997), partnerships and problem-solving by Dennis Rosenbaum (Coldren, Costello, Forde, Roehl, and Rosenbaum 2002), causes and correlates of juvenile delinquency by David Huizinga, Rolf Loeber, and Terence Thornberry (Causes and Correlates of Delinquency n.d.), and the Blueprints for Violence Prevention initiative (Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence n.d.) have had a significant impact on crime prevention practice and policy. Policy makers continue to promote the use of crime prevention programs, particularly those that are evidence based or knowledge based. The picture of success, however, is not entirely positive. National economic difficulties have led to worries that crime prevention programs will lose important financial support. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

American Crime Prevention: Trends and New Frontiers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.