Stones of the Nile: The Photographic Discovery of Egypt

By Howe, Kathleen Stewart | Queen's Quarterly, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Stones of the Nile: The Photographic Discovery of Egypt


Howe, Kathleen Stewart, Queen's Quarterly


Late in the hot afternoon of 21 July 1798, Napoleon stood before the French army, arrayed in battle formation on the plains of the west bank of the Nile, between the great pyramids of Giza and the village of Imbaba. The army stood waiting to engage the Mameluke force drawn up before them. Gesturing toward the heavy forms on the horizon, General Bonaparte invoked the pyramids as witness to French glory. "Soldiers, forty centuries look down upon you." The Army of the Nile overwhelmed the Mamelukes, Cairo fell to the French, and Egypt was conquered. Sixty-nine years later, Mark Twain visited the same spot, and noted a new army of invaders on Cheop's ancient territory. "Insect men and women were creeping about its dizzy perches ..." The Battle of the Pyramids and the tourist infestation of Cheops' "dizzy perches" in 1867 would seem to have little in common. Yet they are linked by the train of events set in motion when Napoleon decided to annex Egypt to France in 1798; these events encompass the acquisition, exploration, spoliation and consumption of Egypt during the nineteenth century.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Francis Frith, Ramesseum at Qurna, Thebes, 1858

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Frith on graffiti: "On the right shoulder of the colossus is the prenomen of Rameses II. On the head may be seen the barbarous inscriptions of modern travelers--instances of a mama as reprehensible as it is childish. It is to be hoped that the best-known names will be collected and published, in order that the consequent disgrace may deter others from earning the same notoriety."

Francis Frith, Mount Serbal from the Wadi Feyran, 1858

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Frith commented in detail about this image:

"The view was taken during a storm, which may partly account for its great success. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stones of the Nile: The Photographic Discovery of Egypt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.