Nursing Home Care Demand Increasing

USA TODAY, August 1993 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Nursing Home Care Demand Increasing


The graying of America places increasing demands on the shrinking number of physicians willing to care for nursing home patients, according to a University of Missouri-Columbia study. More than 1,500,000 people live in the nation's 20,000 nursing homes. That number is expected to hit 3,000,000 by the year 2020, when 55,000,000, or 18%, of Americans will be over age 65. The proportion of elderly is highest in rural areas.

The average doctor who tends patients in nursing homes is a primary-care provider (family physician, general internist, or osteopathic general practitioner) who has been licensed for less than 20 years and is just as likely as not to be board certified in a medical specialty. He or she averages six Medicaid patients, but some of his or her peers who are medical directors at nursing homes may care for up to several hundred patients at one or more facilities.

Although many younger physicians see nursing home residents, fewer medical graduates in recent years have chosen to go into primary care, resulting in a shortage of generalist doctors in some inner-city and rural areas as many of the older general practitioners retire. Of these newer doctors, many don't consider a nursing home practice attractive futility in not seeing patients' conditions improve, the need to see patients outside the office, and low Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements, notes Steven C.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Nursing Home Care Demand Increasing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?