First Coordinator, Disabled Sports Programs

By DePauw, Karen | Palaestra, Spring 1993 | Go to article overview

First Coordinator, Disabled Sports Programs


DePauw, Karen, Palaestra


Since 1978, athletes with disabilities have been inching toward acceptance with the United States Olympic Committee (USOC). The reconstitution of the Committee on Sports for the Disabled (COSD) and the appointment of a Coordinator for Disabled Sports Programs have been two significant steps in this progress toward inclusion and acceptance.

The COSD reorganization has been detailed in a previous COSD Forum; this Forum is devoted to the appointment of Jan Elizabeth Wilson as the first Coordinator, Disabled Sports Programs.

In late 1992, Jan Wilson was selected to serve as the Coordinator for Disabled Sports Programs. This position is found in the USOC Grants & Athlete Assistance Department located at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. As Coordinator, Jan serves as the USOC liaison for sports programs for persons with disabilities in three primary areas: (a) long range planning and grant activities of the USOC member Disabled Sport Organizations (DSO), (b) coordination of USOC sponsored activities for disabled sports teams, and (c) governmental relations and social issues pertaining to sport for individuals with disabilities. Among the duties and responsibilities are found the following (taken from the Position Description-- Job No: GA06139-13):

* Provide assistance to DSOs for the development and implementation of long-range strategic plans, especially with regard to integration of athletes with disabilities into able-bodied sports programs.

* Assist in the implementation of USOC policies and procedures for the Olympic Grant Program and programs for disabled sports; monitor progress and provide accounting of Olympic Grants awarded to DSOs.

* Provide administrative support for disabled sports teams competing in events to which the USOC sends teams such as...

...selection procedures for athletes, coach and disabled sport team delegations,

... selection of team apparel,

... coordination of team processing functions, including site and staffing of processing venues,

... coordination of interaction with Local Organizing Committee personal to secure credentials for United States delegation members,

... interact with USOC Director of Government Relations regarding those issues relating to sports for individuals with disabilities which may come before the federal government,

... serve as Staff Liaison to the Committee on Sports for the Disabled,

... draft informational and educational materials relating to sports for individuals with disabilities for those served by the USOC.

Jan Wilson is both professionally and personally well qualified for the position of Coordinator, Disabled Sports Programs. …

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