No10 Given 45-Point Plan to End Scandal of Postal Voting Fraud

The Evening Standard (London, England), May 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

No10 Given 45-Point Plan to End Scandal of Postal Voting Fraud


Byline: JOE MURPHY

SWEEPING demands were made today for a cleanup of postal voting after the election was blighted by ballot-box scandals.

A report from the Electoral Commission made 45 recommendations for detecting and punishing bogus voters.

They included strict security checks when people register to vote and for the Government's experiments in all-postal ballots to be abandoned.

The commission accompanied its report with a warning to Downing Street not to "cherrypick" its proposals.

Chairman Sam Younger said at a Westminster launch: "We see it as a package that hangs together - not simply a menu you can pick from as you like."

The Government however, said it would water down a key proposal, for every voter to register individually.

At present, one person signs off a list of all eligible voters in each household, a system open to fraud as "ghost" voters can be invented.

The commission said each voter should have his or her own form, to be signed in person and submitted along with personal details to enable identities to be checked later.

Mr Younger said "individual registration" was a cornerstone of the antifraud measures, because signatures could be checked when people sent in postal ballot papers. No10 said one form per household was adequate providing each resident signed it as it would be "administratively easier". …

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No10 Given 45-Point Plan to End Scandal of Postal Voting Fraud
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