And Another Thing

The Evening Standard (London, England), May 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

And Another Thing


Uzbekistan blocks UN inquiry At least two people behind murder of God's Banker, says police report TWO or more men strangled "God's Banker" Roberto Calvi, then hung his body beneath Blackfriars Bridge, a police report has revealed.

The City of London Police have filed a formal submission to the Italian authorities concluding that the 62-year-old's death was murder, not suicide.

The Italians have now charged four men with his killing.

UZBEK President Islam Karimov told UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan he opposed a human rights inquiry into violence in the eastern part of his country in which more than 700 civilians are alleged to have been killed by security forces. Mr Annan said Mr Karimov told him "he had the situation under control and was taking measures to bring those responsible to account and did not need an international team to establish the facts".

Nurse accused of two killings A NURSE in Oxfordshire has been charged with the murders of two elderly men. Benjamin Geen is accused of killing David Onley, 77, and Anthony Bateman, 67, who died at Horton General Hospital, Banbury in January last year.

Geen, 24, was also charged with grievous bodily harm when he appeared before magistrates.

46 vehicles involved in A20 crashes AT LEAST 46 vehicles were involved in 10 separate crashes on the A20 around Dover. Police said 19 people were injured in the accidents last night. Fog is thought to have been a contributing factor as local hospitals were placed on a major incident footing. Two firefighters were treated after breathing in dust from a hazardous load. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

And Another Thing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.