Next Stop Istanbul: Scousers' Guide to Istanbul; AS Liverpool Fans Fly out for the Champions League Final We Have Produced a Rough Guide to the City of Istanbul for Those Unfamiliar with the Turkish Way of Life

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), May 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

Next Stop Istanbul: Scousers' Guide to Istanbul; AS Liverpool Fans Fly out for the Champions League Final We Have Produced a Rough Guide to the City of Istanbul for Those Unfamiliar with the Turkish Way of Life


MONEY: THE last time Liverpool's travelling army went to Turkey the exchange rate was several hundred thousand Lira to the pound, making calculations a real headache.

On January 1, 2005, however, Turkey changed their currency and dropped several zeroes and now it is much easier. There are about 2.5 Turkish Lira to the pound.

Travellers cheques are difficult to exchange in Turkey. Either exchange your money before leaving or simply use your visa or debit card in the numerous ATM machines

BEER: A person who has obviously been drinking will be refused entry into the stadium. Beer sold on draught is the cheapest option with it also being available in cans and bottles. The most popular beer in Turkey is called Efes Pilsen. Corona, Bud and Heineken are available but they are pricey. With both wine and spirits it is better to drink domestically produced as the imported options are very expensive

DRUGS: In a word DON'T! You may have heard that all the best gear outside of Amsterdam can be found in Istanbul. It may well be true . . . but the film Midnight Express was also based on a true story. Even smoking a joint could get you into serious trouble. Just enjoy the excellent Efes beer

SIGHT-SEEING: Istanbul is divided into many neighbourhoods. The most colourful is the Sultanmet - which contains the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sofia, Topkapi, Hippodrome, Yerebatan Cistern and plenty of other historic sites and surprises

DRESS CODE: Turkey is a modern country and dress is in general casual and comfortable. You can dress as you like in and around Istanbul - UNLESS you are visiting a mosque. Neither shorts, short skirts nor bare shoulders are allowed in mosques and a head covering for women is greatly appreciated. You will also be required to remove your shoes upon entering a mosque

EATING OUT: A service charge of ten to fifteen per cent is accepted at the fancier restaurants. But it goes straight to the management. In some places the tip is included in the service charge so there is no need to give any extra. …

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