'Earnie Gave Us Runaround and So We Decided to Go Back to the Drawing Board'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

'Earnie Gave Us Runaround and So We Decided to Go Back to the Drawing Board'


Byline: By GRAHAM CLUTTON

Twelve months ago Michael Owen was thumbing his personal scrapbook for the pictorial evidence of the day he spent chasing former Cardiff City striker Robert Earnshaw around on a local parks football pitch when they were younger.

How times change.

Tonight, at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, the young man who began this season with an injury which could have threatened his very presence in the Dragons side, let alone Wales, will lead the British Lions in their warm-up Test against Argentina.

It has been one of those Roy of the Rovers stories. Only for football, read rugby, for Roy, read Michael and for Rovers, read the Valleys.

The rise, as they say, has been meteoric. From those hilarious football days on the fields of Pontyclun, where Owen and best friend and fellow Lion Gethin Jenkins kicked anything that moved, it has been a catalogue of intrigue and entertainment, of unbridled joy and unprecedented success.

For the record, and Owen and Jenkins will hold up their hands and admit as much.

Earnie gave the pair a real runaround on that Sunday afternoon in Pontyclun when their paths crossed.

Striking in those days for GE, a little-known Sunday outfit from the outskirts of Caerphilly, Earnshaw was targeted by the midfield maestros as the one to watch.

Jenkins recalls how Owen warned him of the diminutive force.

'We were a pretty good double act at that time,' smiled Jenkins. 'If anyone managed to get around me, they ran straight into Michael!

'Most of the time it was pretty messy, but Earnshaw was a bit better than us and as hard as we tried, we couldn't even get close.

'In the end he scored a couple, or maybe five! We had to go back to the drawing board. We tried, but couldn't catch him.'

Owen and Jenkins were prodigious sports talents at school, with Owen showing his leadership skills by taking on the captaincy of the football, rugby and cricket teams, before realising that his size and stature was probably best suited to full time egg-chasing.

Together the pair moved on to Pontypridd RFC where they once again struck up a wonderful forward partnership - Gethin in the front row and Michael at the back end.

Despite their rapid progression at Sardis Road, they never once forgot their roots and continued to turn out for Pontyclun at football, until the choice had to be made.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Earnie Gave Us Runaround and So We Decided to Go Back to the Drawing Board'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.