Bachelors with Money and Clout

By Norment, Lynn | Ebony, October 1993 | Go to article overview

Bachelors with Money and Clout


Norment, Lynn, Ebony


In politics, entertainment and sports, single men with power and influence command attention

Since time eternal, clout and money have been forceful aphrodisiacs, and these two qualities continue to pack a special magnetic appeal in the 1990s. In the powerful corridors of Washington, D. C., the luxury suites of Hollywood and the gold-laden sports arenas, men with talent, money and power command attention and respect. Talent helps, but money talks and clout opens doors.

While many of the rich and influential are happily married, there are quite a few bachelors whose million-dollar incomes and high-profile positions make them prime prospects for the abundant number of single women -- of all ages and backgrounds -- who hope to find that special love.

The possibilities include entertainment moguls, sports heroes, U. S. congressmen and even a member of the president's cabinet. On the following pages is a sampling of rich and/or powerful Black men who happen to be single.

SHAQUILLE O'NEAL, the 7-foot, 300-pound basketball star, has taken the NBA by storm. With a $40 million contract, the Orlando Magic star is getting plenty of attention from fans, especially female admirers.

MIKE ESPY was named U. S. secretary of agriculture by President Bill Clinton last January, making him one of the most powerful men in the country, and one of the most eligible bachelors. The 39-year-old Mississippian, who is vice-chair of the Democratic Leadership Council, was first elected to the U. S. House of Representatives in 1986.

WESLEY SNIPES, the actor who has starred in hit movies such as Rising Sun, Passenger 57 and Jungle Fever, is a dreamboat to thousands of women. Snipes, 31, says his Jungle Fever role did not reflect his personal feelings. "It's more important for me to try to develop a good relationship between a Black man and a Black woman," says the handsome divorced father who lives on Santa Monica Beach.

L. DOUGLAS WILDER, governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, is the epitome of charm and charisma. A divorced father of three adult children, Wilder resides alone in the elegant governor's mansion adjacent to the State Capitol in Richmond. Well-traveled and socially active, the personable governor commands attention and respect around the world.

KEITH SWEAT is a heartthrob, a fact reflected in his romantic recordings. The debonair 30- something recording artist has two multiplatinum albums to his credit. His huge Atlanta-area dream house has a swimming pool, indoor and outdoor Jacuzzis, spiral staircase and marbled bathrooms. The former Wall Street brokerage assistant has come a long way from the Harlem housing project of his youth.

KWEISI MFUME, D-Md., is chairman of the powerful Congressional Black Caucus. Last November, the dynamic 44-year-old Baltimore native, who was reared in a slum plagued by drugs and crime, was elected to his fourth term in Congress. He serves on the Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee. A former member of the Baltimore City Council, the Maryland State Central Committee and professor at his alma mater, Morgan State University, Mfume is reserved though personable. Divorced, he relaxes by developing computer programs and listening to jazz.

RUSSELL SIMMONS, the 35-year-old millionaire rap impresario, is cofounder of Def Jam Records, CEO of Rush Comunications and producer of HBO's Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam. His management company boasts a roster that includes Run-D.M.C., LL Cool J, Public Enemy and 3rd Base. In addition, the Queens native has a line of hip-hop clothing called Phat. Though he still loves wearing jeans and sneakers, he gets around New York in a Rolls Royce and lives in a triplex penthouse formerly owned by Cher. …

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