EDGE EMPLOYER AWARDS: Prizes to Reward Learning Initiatives

The Birmingham Post (England), May 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

EDGE EMPLOYER AWARDS: Prizes to Reward Learning Initiatives


Organisations in Birmingham that enter the Birmingham Post Edge Employer Awards could be in with a chance of winning part of the pounds 460,000 total prize fund.

Birmingham based Manufacturing Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation, has entered because Director James Bentley is a strong believer in practical learning and its benefits to both young people and organisations.

James Bentley says: 'By opening young people's eyes to modern business practices, the huge range of jobs available and what people actually do at work, we can help students make an informed choice on curriculum subject choice, college and career options.'

The Birmingham Post Edge Employers Awards are searching for three organisations that provide the very best practical learning for 14 - 25 year olds. These three organisations will be automatically shortlisted for the West Midlands regional final.

The awards will honour four outstanding organisations in the region as part of a national scheme. There is pounds 20,000 up for grabs for organisations in the West Midlands to reinvest in work-related learning for young people.

Organisations will need to demonstrate how they already offer excellent learning-by-doing opportunities such as apprenticeships, work placements and traineeships, and explain their ambitions for the future.

Deadline for newspaper entries is next Friday, June 3. To enter, please complete the internet form on http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/birminghampost/business/edge/. For further information go to www.edgeawards.co.uk, call 0800 980 3343, or email info@edgeawards.co.uk 17-year old Simon Colver, talking about his three-day work shadowing opportunity with James Bentley, said: 'The three days really opened my eyes to what kind of careers there are out there. I now realise that there are jobs where using engineering skills are only a part of the responsibility. You can be involved in selling, designing, and you might have to use language skills.

'It is very difficult to get a clear idea of what the world of industry is like. No matter how many books you read, there is nothing so helpful as to see it with your own eyes. Ihad a strong idea that manufacturing was dark and dirty, with monotonous jobs that no one really enjoyed doing. It is totally different.

The work shadowing experience was a fantastic thing to do. I broadened my knowledge of engineering, and met some really enthusiastic people, as well as getting enormous fun into the bargain. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EDGE EMPLOYER AWARDS: Prizes to Reward Learning Initiatives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.