Natural Wonder of a Wild Frontier; Critic's Choice

Daily Mail (London), May 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

Natural Wonder of a Wild Frontier; Critic's Choice


Byline: TOM KYLE

WILD LAND: IMAGES OF NATURE FROM THE CAIRNGORMS

by Peter Cairns and Mark Hamblin

(Mercat Press, [pounds sterling]25)

THERE is little truly wild land left anywhere in Europe, let alone in Scotland. The Carpathian Mountains, perhaps; or the High Pyrenees; or the remoter shores of Assynt.

The dawn of a new millennium and the designation of the Cairngorms as Britain's largest national park inspired the authors, both of whom are renowned wildlife photographers, to create a visual celebration of the wild natural wonders that can still be found - if you care to look long and hard enough.

Though the A9, Scotland's main road north, cuts along its western perimeter, the Cairngorms National Park still contains pockets of truly wild land. Peter Cairns and Mark Hamblin have sought these out, so the reader can see them in this book - and perhaps be inspired to see them in reality.

Although the images are all-important, this is by no means a book without words.

Each of the eight main sections is preceded by an introductory essay.

These celebrate the Cairngorms in particular, but also conservation in general.

Applying human- led conservation techniques to wild land is perhaps a contradiction in terms, but it is also probably the only way to prevent the remaining wild land from disappearing in the course of our lifetimes.

Simply to open this book at the beginning, as you do, is to get something of a shock. The first few pictures are certainly of wild things in wild land - but they are wolf and bear, wild boar and bison. None of these pictures were taken in Scotland, of course, but all at one time could have been - and could be again.

The reintroduction of extinct species to Scotland is a subject of constant controversy, the most celebrated example being the wolf. Despite the spectacular success of such a move in the world's first national park - America's famous Yellowstone - opposition here often borders on the hysterical.

AS the authors point out, despite extensive research, opinion for and against returning the wolf to Scotland is often ill-informed.

The creature, the epitome of the wilderness, is one of the most studied of all wild animals - yet it remains the most misunderstood.

Such arguments aside, the range of wildlife Scotland does have is impressive enough, and the images in the book are quite simply stunning.

A tawny owl seems literally to grow out of the hollow tree trunk on which it perches, so perfectly do their colours conform. A rare sighting of a young pine marten was one of only two shots taken in a six-week period, which gives the reader some notion of the difficulties inherent in this sort of photography. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Natural Wonder of a Wild Frontier; Critic's Choice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.