LEGAL & FINANCE: Fraud Bill Is a Mess, Says Ernst & Young

The Birmingham Post (England), June 10, 2005 | Go to article overview

LEGAL & FINANCE: Fraud Bill Is a Mess, Says Ernst & Young


The new Fraud Bill is a mess, it has been claimed.

The Bill, which aims to clarify the offence of fraud and simplify the prosecution process will, say accountants Ernst & Young, fail to protect businesses.

Introduced on May 26, it addresses criticisms of the Government's reform advisors, the Law Commission.

Their report found that the current laws covering fraud are too specific, overlap with each other, and contain loopholes. The proposed new single offence of fraud will carry a maximum sentence of ten years in jail.

Commenting on the new Bill, Jonathan Middup, head of the forensic investigation team at Ernst & Young's Birmingham office, said: 'The changes to the Bill include measures designed to tackle the growing problem of internet fraud - particularly phishing scams.

'Many of us will have been targeted by fraudsters claiming to be legitimate financial institutions, mirroring bank web sites to gain confidential customer details. Under the new proposals, the criminal will be committing fraud by false representation and can be prosecuted by simply showing intent to defraud.'

Mr Middup said that although the Bill may increase protection from external fraud, it fails to help companies protect themselves from internal fraudsters, which is the biggest threat to businesses across the region. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

LEGAL & FINANCE: Fraud Bill Is a Mess, Says Ernst & Young
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.