Knights in Broad Daylight Medieval Society, MCC Explore Middle Ages for Education

By Krone, Emily | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Knights in Broad Daylight Medieval Society, MCC Explore Middle Ages for Education


Krone, Emily, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Emily Krone Daily Herald Staff Writer

Helmets, tunics, swords, men in tights - nearly everything medieval but the plague - filled McHenry County College courtyard last week.

The Society for Creative Anachronism, an international group that re-enacts and recreates medieval times, was presenting its version of medieval history to a postmodern audience of Western Civilization students.

Instructor Alan Shear, who traces his ancestry to Attila the Hun, had enlisted the group to give his class a small taste of what it was like to live once upon a time.

"The idealization of the Middle Ages is part of our culture," Shear said.

The five presenters - who occasionally lapsed into speaking Norman French - jousted bit, showed off their body armor and shared random bits of medieval trivia.

Why did knights wear red linen beneath their chain mail?

To absorb blunt trauma and camouflage their blood, society members said.

How did knights move with all that cumbersome armor?

They only wore the heavy stuff for tournaments. The average suit of arms weighed 55 pounds, about the same as a standard army pack.

After a lengthy explanation of tournament shields, one student asked "squire" John Seaton people ever shared a coat of arms.

"I would whack someone who tried to wear my device! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Knights in Broad Daylight Medieval Society, MCC Explore Middle Ages for Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.