Children Sacrificed in London Churches, Say Police

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 16, 2005 | Go to article overview

Children Sacrificed in London Churches, Say Police


Byline: RICHARD EDWARDS

BOYS from Africa are being murdered as human sacrifices in London churches.

They are being brought into the capital to be offered up in rituals by fundamentalist Christian sects, according to a shocking Scotland Yard report.

Followers believe that powerful spells require the deaths of "unblemished" male children.

The leaked report also cites examples of African children being killed after being identified as "witches" by church pastors.

The study was commissioned after the death of Victoria Climbie, who was brought to London where she was starved and beaten to death by her great-aunt who believed the eightyearold was possessed by the devil.

Two weeks ago Sita Kisanga, 35, of Hackney was convicted of torturing an eight-year-old girl from Angola she accused of being a witch. Kisanga was a member of the Combat Spirituel church in Dalston.

Many such churches, supported mainly by people from West Africa, perform aggressive forms of exorcism.

There are believed to be 300 similar churches in the UK, mostly in London.

The aim of the Met study was to create an "open dialogue" with the African and Asian community in Newham and Hackney. In discussions with African community leaders officers were told of examples of children being murdered because their parents or carers believe them to be possessed by "evil spirits". …

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