Blessed Public-Health Curse; More Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 17, 2005 | Go to article overview

Blessed Public-Health Curse; More Americans Living with HIV/AIDS


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It has been 23 years since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially identified the insidious disease Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. The year was 1982, and there were an estimated 1,300 cases of HIV/AIDS reported in the United States. This week we learned that more than 1 million people in this country are HIV infected. Some people in the homosexual community said nearly a decade ago that the HIV/AIDS epidemic had been arrested. We now know that was not true.

Indeed, while noted journalists like Andrew Sullivan posited that the HIV/AIDS epidemic was a public-health crisis no more, reality rested elsewhere. The unvarnished truth was that the face of AIDS apparently had changed from the image of homosexual white men and black junkies shooting up dope in ghetto back alleys to images and behaviors that are as multifaceted and complex as the very medical cocktails available to treat the disease.

Americans now know they were suckered. While gay white men might have "protected" themselves by using condoms, they also ratcheted up their push for federal, state and local policies that allowed them to hide "sexual preferences" and practices in the name of privacy and civil rights.

The liberals' advocacy for needle-exchange programs is but one example. The push for condom availability for teens is another, as well as the shouts against what the new pope, Pope Benedict the XVI, rightly calls "pseudo matrimony"- that is, "same-sex marriage." And one of the most untenable issues of them all: allowing public schools to teach children in the name of education that when it comes to sexuality and sex itself, anything - and everything - goes.

Activists surely don't want any alarms sounded about what the politically correct term "MSM,"the so-called down-low practice of bisexual men keeping their devilish proclivities on the hush-hush, and they certainly don't want us to focus on pedophilia.

The barebacked ride to socio-political freedoms has made for a short trip.

According to statistics released just this week by the CDC, women, black Americans and Hispanics are leaving indelible impressions on HIV/AIDS. In fact, the tally for U.S. HIV cases has now surpassed the 1 million mark. "An estimated 1,039,000 to 1,185,000 Americans were living with HIV at the end of 2003, up from between 850,000 and 950,000 in 2002," The Washington Times reported on Tuesday. …

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Blessed Public-Health Curse; More Americans Living with HIV/AIDS
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