Fazzino Creates for Major Film Festivals

Art Business News, June 2005 | Go to article overview

Fazzino Creates for Major Film Festivals


ROCHELLE, NY -- The world-renowned 3-D pop artist Charles Fazzino has been busy preparing imagery for major film festivals across the United States. The artist was chosen as the featured artist for the documentaries, "Showbusiness" and "James Dean: ForeverYoung"

Fazzino was invited by Broadway Film and award-winning Producer/Director Dori Berinstein to create a movie poster to celebrate her new Broadway film documentary, "Showbusiness" The film made its debut on April 25 at the Tribeca Film Festival and tracks four Broadway musicals--"Wicked;' "Avenue Q," "Taboo," and "Caroline"--from inception through the Tony Awards. Fazzino's image focuses on the behind-the-scenes makings of a Broadway musical, narrowing in on the characters, and the "blood, sweat and tears" invested in the staging of a large-scale production.

"I have always loved Broadway and it has been the focus of much of my work" says Fazzino. "It's been amazing to see how much time and effort goes into making a Broadway musical and it's only given me greater sense of appreciation for the art form."

The artist conducted a poster signing at the film's premier, held at Tribeca Center for the Performing Arts. All proceeds from the sale of movie posters were donated to Broadway Cares and Equity Fights Aids.

"We are honored to have Charles Fazzino--a true Broadway historian--celebrating the release of our documentary," says Berinstein.

In addition, a piece by Charles Fazzino was chosen as the official image of the 2005 James Dean Fest, June 3-5, in the actor's birthplace, Marion, IN. …

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