James Joyce Factfile

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), June 17, 2005 | Go to article overview

James Joyce Factfile


James Joyce's unique gift as a writer has gained him followers worldwide, who mark his life and works with the annual festivities of Bloomsday. n James Joyce was born in Dublin on February 2, 1882, the son of John Stanislaus Joyce, an impoverished gentleman who had failed in a distillery business and tried all kinds of professions, including politics and tax collecting. But, in spite of their poverty, the family struggled to maintain a solid middle-class facade. n Joyce was educated at Belvedere College in Dublin and then at University College, Dublin, and his first publication was an essay on Ibsen's play When We Dead Awaken in 1900. n He graduated in 1902 and fled to Paris, working as a journalist and teacher but earning little money. He returned home after a year as his mother was dying. n Joyce had a strained relationship with Dublin and in 1904 left again with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid who he married in 1931. n He was passionately in love with Nora and love letters between the pair are some of the most obscenely passionate correspondences ever made public. n Joyce had a string of highly-acclaimed works published, from Dubliners in 1914, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in 1916, a play Exiles in 1918 and his masterpiece Ulysses in 1922.

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