Internet Librarian: An Open Source Social Movement

By Janes, Joseph | American Libraries, June-July 2005 | Go to article overview

Internet Librarian: An Open Source Social Movement


Janes, Joseph, American Libraries


David Silver really wants you to know that the September Project isn't about September 11, 2001. Of course it started as a reaction to that day, now resonant with such power throughout our culture; however, the September Project (www.thesep temberproject.org) uses the date instead as a catalyst for discussions about democracy, citizenship, and patriotism that will take place--naturally--every September 11 (AL, Sept. 2004, p. 69).

Silver's not a librarian; he's my faculty colleague in the University of Washington's communications department. When he and his partner Sarah Washburn (formerly of the Gates Foundation) were conceiving this project, they landed on libraries as an attractive venue because they seemed like safe places to hold these discussions.

At the very beginning, this idea, like so many others, was an attempt to commemorate September 11 in a positive and constructive way. The concept spread very quickly, and in ways it never could have without the internet. Obviously, the speed and reach of the Web facilitated that spread, which was also fostered by a simple but valuable technique often used in building virtual communities. Silver and Washburn built up an idea bank with initial notions for events suggested by early adopters. This seeding process helped people to see what other libraries were thinking about and to then add new ideas of their own to the bank, which soon snowballed and broadly expanded interest and participation in the project.

In addition, a map on the website showing participating libraries was a big deal. It helped new libraries to visualize who was on board and see the momentum as others joined in increasing numbers. It also provided a vivid presence of the growing project (and was frequently updated--so much so that at least one library was a little annoyed that it didn't get on the map for several hours after it had signed on).

Not about the Net

Among the most surprising aspects of the project, at least from my perspective, is that the day itself was not about the internet. It was about the discussions, the conversations, the interactions, the communication, all of which happened in real time, person to person, all over the country and indeed around the world.

It would have been easy to conceive of a similar project housed on the internet, which in fact could have had broader reach and involved more people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internet Librarian: An Open Source Social Movement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.