Women the Better Half in Sports Behavior

By Freeman, Mike | The Florida Times Union, June 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Women the Better Half in Sports Behavior


Freeman, Mike, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Mike Freeman

The middle digit kindly presented to fans. The crotch grab. The loaded gun. Sorry, the loaded guns. Jeff's hissy fit. An NFL team-produced video featuring naked women and homophobic remarks. This was the week of men behaving badly.

If you are a male athlete or sports fan, lower your head in shame, and worship at the alter of the X chromosome. In the sports world these days, woe is to be a member of the male species.

Because of all the silly, knuckleheaded and inexplicably dumb things male sports figures have done in recent days, women have now become the moral compass of the sports universe; the true role models for kids.

The women athletes aren't serial boasters, packing Whizzinators or getting the munchies. If a WNBA player has been charged with reenacting scenes from Gunsmoke the way the Washington Redskins' Sean Taylor and Mike Doss of the Indianapolis Colts have been, the news has yet to hit the wire. Can't seem to recall any women thanking their lucky stars for being released from a prison camp, the way Jamal Lewis recently did.

At the Memorial golf championship, David Toms, while three-putting on the ninth, inexplicably made an obscene gesture to fans by raising his middle finger, acting like a brat who was just told to shut off the television and go to bed. The only bird you'll see from Annika Sorenstam is the one she drains from 18 feet. The only thing Mia Hamm will assault are stereotypes about the supposed weaker sex.

Texas Rangers closer Francisco Cordero put an exclamation point on his win over the Kansas City Royals by glaring at the Royals bench and grabbing his crotch. Lisa Leslie grabs rebounds. Cordero grabs his you-know-what.

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