Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2004-2005

The Journal of African American History, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2004-2005


The Association for the Study of African American Life and History and The Journal of African American History are pleased to present the list of the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers for 2004-2005. These lecturers are among the leading scholars in the field of African American history and culture.

We hope that you will begin to make plans to bring one of these speakers to your campus, institution, or fundraising activity for your ASALH branch or local cultural organization. Lecture sponsors agree to pay $1,000 lectureship fee to The Journal of African American History ($500 of which will go to the speaker) as well as the lecturer's travel and lodging expenses (if any).

This is an important way to help support the ongoing activities of The Journal of African American History.

The Journal of African American History

Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Teachers College Box 75

Columbia University

525 West 120th Street

New York, NY 10027

Telephone: 212.678.8103

Dr. V. P. Franklin, Editor: vpf9@columbia.edu

Editorial Office: JAAH@tc.edu

Website: http://iume.tc.columbia.edu/jaah/

Derrick Alridge, University of Georgia

* "W. E. B. Du Bois and the Education of Black People"

* "Hip Hop As a Social and Intellectual Movement"

* "Metaphors and Symbolic Representations of Blacks in U.S. History Textbooks"

Dr. Derrick P. Alridge is Associate Professor of Social Foundations of Education at the University of Georgia, Athens. His areas of scholarship include the history of U.S. African American education, civil rights studies, and hip hop studies. He is currently codirector of the Foot Soldier Project for Civil Rights Studies at UGA--a research project that produces historical documentaries on the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia. Professor Alridge's work has been published in a variety of journals, including The Journal of African American History, The Journal of Negro Education, and The Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment.

Felix Armfield, Buffalo State College/SUNY

* "Eugene Kinckle Jones and the Founding of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity"

* "Eugene Kinckle Jones and Black Social Work"

* "Black Social Work Education and the Supreme Court's Gaines v. Missouri Decision, 1938"

Dr. Felix Armfield is Associate Professor of History at Buffalo State College in the Department of History and Social Studies Education. He also was a member of the faculty of Western Illinois University from 1995 to 2000. Most recently, he published the book Black Life in West Central Illinois (2001), and is presently working on a biography of Eugene Kinckle Jones, a black social work pioneer in the early 20th century and the first Executive Secretary of the National Urban League, 1916-1940.

Deidre Hill Butler, Union College

* "Activist Mothering in African American Families"

* "The Split: A Womanist Interpretation of an Episode of Suburban Black Community Reconfiguration, 1904-1920"

* "Having Our Say: Teaching Black Studies to Our Community and Beyond"

Dr. Deidre Hill Butler came to Union College from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, where she earned her Ph.D. Dr. Butler's research interests include the social geography of race, class, and gender in African American social institutions in New England and the role of African American women in contemporary stepfamilies. She has received recognition for her scholarship from the New York African American Institute and the Massachusetts Historical League. Dr. Butler has served on the Program Committee for the Association of Black Sociologists and the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, and is a member of the American Sociological Association. She is an active member of the Black Women Health Project, a national black women's grassroots health initiative.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2004-2005
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.