Teaming: Constructing High-Quality Faculty Development in a PT3 Project

By Ludwig, Meredith; Taymans, Juliana | Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, Autumn 2005 | Go to article overview

Teaming: Constructing High-Quality Faculty Development in a PT3 Project


Ludwig, Meredith, Taymans, Juliana, Journal of Technology and Teacher Education


Research has provided important lessons about developing and delivering high-quality professional development to educators. Features identified as indicative of high-quality professional learning experiences are the organization of the activity and its duration, the extent to which there is collective participation of teachers within an education institution, the degree of active learning opportunities, a content focus, and the degree to which the activity promotes coherence in professional development goals (Garet, Porter, Desimone, Birman, & Suk Yoon, 2001). The evaluation of the Teacher Technology Leaders (TTL) PT3 (1) Project at George Washington University (GWU) has been documenting the evolution of a professional development strategy exhibiting a number of these quality features. Over the three years of the project life, project staff and participants have been constructing knowledge and practice regarding the infusion of technology in teaching and learning by working first as individuals on their own knowledge development and then constructing multilayered teams with representatives from university, school, and technology partners. The results thus far have shown that progress has been enhanced by collective participation with a content focus in the study of a particular problem. In the following article, the evolution of this approach is presented and implications for faculty development are discussed.

**********

In the past five years, a number of key organizations and research studies have contributed to the knowledge about how to structure high quality professional development. Although fewer studies connect these features to student learning and achievement, more work in this regard is currently being funded by federal agencies, such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in the Department of Education.

The Council for Basic Education (CBE) held a Wingspread conference in 2001 and released a report listing the many sets of principles for high-quality professional development resulting from research and published in the educational literature. CBE recommended a few approaches (lesson study, student work, and assessment practice) as promising. Principles and strategies for effective professional development researched and described by Loucks-Horsley, Stiles, & Hewson (1996; also, Mundry & Loucks-Horsley, 1999) and her associates have been cited throughout the literature as well as the recognition of the challenging process of making decisions about professional development.

A National Evaluation of the Eisenhower Professional Development Program contributed a model to analyze the relationships between features of professional development and teachers' self-reported increases in knowledge and skills and changes in teaching practice. On the basis of national sample data, the researchers concluded that six key features of professional development are effective in improving teaching practice. Three are characteristics of the structure of the activity: (a) the organization of the activity-whether it is a reform type, such as a study group or teacher network, in contrast to a traditional workshop or conference; (b) the duration of the activity, including the total number of contact hours and the span of time over which it extends; and (c) the extent to which the activity has collective participation of groups of teachers from the same school, department, or grade. Three additional features are characteristics of the substance of the activity: (d) the degree to which the activity has active learning opportunities for teachers; (e) the extent to which the activity has a content focus; and (f) the degree to which the activity promotes coherence in teachers' professional development by incorporating the experiences that are consistent with teachers' goals and aligned with state standards and assessments. (Garet et al., 2001) Although this model was tested with teachers of mathematics and science, its findings regarding change in teaching practice are supported by other arenas of research regarding the development of new skills or knowledge, such as constructivist theory, technology skill development, and team development. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaming: Constructing High-Quality Faculty Development in a PT3 Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.