Can Preservice Teacher Education Really Help Me Grow as a Literacy Teacher?: Examining Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Multimedia Case-Based Instuction

By Baker, Elizabeth A. | Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, Autumn 2005 | Go to article overview

Can Preservice Teacher Education Really Help Me Grow as a Literacy Teacher?: Examining Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Multimedia Case-Based Instuction


Baker, Elizabeth A., Journal of Technology and Teacher Education


Since the 1980s, when studies indicated that inservice teachers perceived that their preservice preparation was inadequate (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985; Lyon, Vaasen, & Toomey, 1989), teacher education programs have made significant efforts to provide meaningful preparation (Imig & Switzer, 1996). One such effort includes the use of multimedia case-based instruction (M-CBI). The purpose of this article is three-fold: (a) to describe findings from studies that examine various issues related to using M-CBI to improve teacher education for literacy teachers, (b) describe Children as Literacy Kases (ChALK), which is an example of M-CBI being used in teacher education for literacy teachers, and (c) describe a study which examined preservice teachers' perceptions of their growth as literacy teachers after participating in a M-CBI/ChALK course. Findings indicate that preservice literacy teachers can perceive that teacher education helps them grow professionally, that M-CBI may be a useful tool in providing meaningful experiences to preservice teachers, and that M-CBI may enhance the meaningfulness of field experiences.

**********

In the 1980s, studies indicated that teachers overwhelmingly perceived that their preservice education did not adequately prepare them to be teachers. Since that time, teacher education programs have made purposeful strides toward improving preservice teacher education. For example, there are improved admissions standards, cohort groupings, refashioned foundations courses, and greater attention to pedagogy (Imig & Switzer, 1996).

With regard to pedagogy, some are attempting to improve teacher education by using case-based instruction (CBI) (Lundeberg, Levin, & Harrington, 1999; Merseth, 1997; Shulman, 1992; Silverman & Welty, 1992). Baker and Wedman (2000) referred to CBI as a pedagogy in which students examine ...

   ... data and a story from a professional situation. For example,
   business cases may be stories which include data about how GE or IBM
   were created and how they have developed. Medical cases may be about
   patients and the results of various tests and interviews. Students in
   professional schools then analyze and discuss these cases to
   determine what content they need to learn and what decisions they
   would make if they were involved in the case. (p. 122)

Baker and Wedman described three types of CBI being used in teacher education: anecdotal, text-based, and multimedia. Each type is used for a variety of reasons and offer users access to different types of data.

The purpose of this article is three-fold: (a) to describe findings from studies that examine various issues related to using M-CBI to improve teacher education for literacy teachers, (b) describe Children as Literacy Kases (ChALK), which is an example of M-CBI being used in teacher education for literacy teachers, and (c) describe a study which examined preservice teachers' perceptions of their growth as literacy teachers after participating in a M-CBI/ChALK course. Findings contribute to the growing bodies of research that investigate teacher education reform, CBI, and uses of multimedia to improve teacher education.

USING M-CBI TO IMPROVE TEACHER EDUCATION FOR LITERACY TEACHERS

Several studies have evaluated various effects of M-CBI on preservice and inservice literacy teachers. Risko, Yount, and McAllister (1992) found that literacy teachers who examined multimedia cases during class asked more questions and more higher level questions than students in similar courses that did not use cases. They also found that the students enrolled in M-CBI courses developed the ability to take multiple perspectives on various teaching issues and problems much earlier than their peers enrolled in similar non-CBI courses. In another study, Risko, Peter, & McAllister (1996) found that M-CBI had an impact on the preservice teachers' abilities to think flexibly in related field experiences and discussions in other courses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Can Preservice Teacher Education Really Help Me Grow as a Literacy Teacher?: Examining Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Multimedia Case-Based Instuction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.