Marine Corps International Education and Training

By Askins, Paul | DISAM Journal, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Marine Corps International Education and Training


Askins, Paul, DISAM Journal


[We would like the thank the editorial staff of the Marine Corps Gazette, for granting us permission to reprint the following article. This article appeared in the Marine Corps Gazette, Volume 6, Issue 12, December 2002, and is as applicable today as it was then. The Marine Corps Gazette web site http://www.mca-marines.org/Gazette/gaz.html]

Since 1943, the earliest date for which records exist at the Marine Corps University, the Marine Corps has provided education and training to over 7,500 international military students who have attended approximately 10,000 individual courses at Commands and Detachments throughout the Corps. Quantico alone, through the Marine Corps University and its predecessor schools, has trained over 3,500 international military students.

During fiscal year 2002, over 500 international military students attended over 800 courses. These courses cover the entire spectrum of Marine Corps education and training, from Command and Staff College to basic electronics. They encompass most Marine Corps military occupational specialties, from aviation to supply and included most Marine Corps weapons systems, from assault amphibian vehicle to non-lethal weapons. These courses embraced most Marine Corps operating areas, from mountain warfare to urban terrain.

An umbrella term that covers this training is security assistance. The Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, Joint Publication 1-02, defines security assistance as follows:

      Groups of programs authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of
   1961, as amended, and the Arms Export Control Act of 1976, as
   amended, and other related statutes by which the United States
   provides defense articles, military training, and other defense
   related services, by grant, loan, credit, or cash sales in
   furtherance of national policies and objectives.

As the term implies, security assistance directly supports our National Security Strategy and our National Military Strategy and is a major component of the Theater Security Cooperation Plans of each regional Combatant Commander. Security assistance supports security cooperation by building military to military relationships with potential coalition partners and by assisting nation-building efforts of current or potential allies. Security assistance is a Department of State initiative executed by the Department of Defense. These programs promote regional stability, maintain U.S. defense alliances and promote civilian control of the military.

Training and education have often been described as the most enduring elements of security assistance. The Marine Corps provides training and education through several major security assistance programs, International Military Education and Training (IMET), Foreign Military Sales (FMS), and Foreign Military Financing (FMF).

* IMET provides training, primarily in the United States, to selected foreign military and related civilian personnel on a grant basis. Congress, as a part of the Department of State's foreign operations appropriation, appropriates funding to support this program annually. Congressional support for this program is increasing with the program doubling in size between fiscal year 2001 and fiscal year 2004. Examples of training provided under IMET include:

** Military Operations in Urban Terrain Mobile Training Team to the Argentine Army

** Command and Staff College

** Expeditionary Warfare School

** Basic Officer Course

** Staff Non-Commissioned Officer Academy

* Foreign military sales is a non-appropriated program through which eligible customer country governments purchase defense articles, services, and training from the United States Government. The purchasing government pays all costs that may be associated with a sale in accordance with the terms of a signed government-to-government agreement.

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