Who's the Victim? Rebecca Is One of a Growing Number of 'Honeytrap' Women Who Earn Their Living Tempting Husbands for Suspicious Wives. Morally Wrong or Merely Exposing Cheats? You Decide

Daily Mail (London), July 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

Who's the Victim? Rebecca Is One of a Growing Number of 'Honeytrap' Women Who Earn Their Living Tempting Husbands for Suspicious Wives. Morally Wrong or Merely Exposing Cheats? You Decide


Byline: DIANA APPLEYARD

THEY are women with the power to make or break marriages.

Honeytraps are paid by increasing numbers of suspicious wives and girlfriends to act as forbidden fruit for their partners. One wrong move and it could mean the end of their relationship. While some would argue the men bring about their own downfall, others will feel it's an underhand way to test a man's fidelity. Rebecca Jones, 23, is a honeytrap for London-based private detective agency, Expedite.

She is single and lives in Battersea, South London. Here, she tells DIANA APPLEYARD her story.

TO KNOW that I can alter the course of two people's lives irrevocably is a massive responsibility, but I know that what I do is justified - even though some people will think it is morally wrong.

Most women who hire a honeytrap are not suspicious wives who think their husbands are cheating - they are women on the verge of making a commitment, such as moving in with a man or getting engaged, and they want to make sure he's not the type to stray.

Sadly, in my experience, all too often they have good reason for thinking their men would be unfaithful. Around 70 per cent of our cases are caught out by a honeytrap.

I got into this line of work while I was at university studying English Literature. It's not something I even knew existed. I was brought up in Surrey - my dad's a policeman and mum is a housing officer - and I wanted to work in the media.

But I was in a bar one night about two years ago when Richard, who runs the detective agency, came up and asked if I would work for him as a honeytrap.

My first reaction was to laugh, but he told me he was genuinely offering me work, so I said I'd think about it.

I was intrigued. The next day, I checked out his company on the internet and it all seemed above board. Plus, at [pounds sterling]50 a night - and most jobs take less than an hour - I thought it would be a great way to earn a bit of extra cash.

But I was worried what I would be doing could be classed as entrapment.

Leading a man on and forcing him to do something wouldn't be fair. I rang Richard, who put my mind at rest.

Honeytraps do not force anyone to do anything - all we do is put ourselves in a position where a man can chat us up - it's up to him to make the running. If he's not interested, we don't push him.

I talked to my parents who, like me, had reservations about my safety - and about the morality of it. As a policeman, my dad was concerned that what I was doing might be illegal, but there are strict regulations about covert and overt recordings and surveillance.

I reassured them I would never be put at risk - Richard is close by at all times, and we're always in a public place.

Interestingly, my friends' reactions were mixed - female friends said 'Go for it!', but my male friends thought it unfair to test other men in such an underhand way. As far as I'm concerned, if they're guilty, I've saved that female client heartache in the future.

I trained with Richard at his office for a couple of weeks, rehearsing situations and learning how to work the recording equipment. As I am always in his sight, we also practised hand signals I could use to alert him to problems.

Richard has about six girls like me on his books, all of us part-time models. We're all in our late 20s and early 30s, because that is the age most of the men we're looking to 'trap' go for.

FIRST, we identify the guy.

Richard always comes with me, often with another member of staff. They sit away from us, and he takes subtle photographs of what's going on, often with a pinhole camera concealed in his shirt collar.

This takes five frames a second, so it's almost like a continuous film. In the case of one guy, Richard had clear pictures of his hand on my bottom, so his wife had the photographic evidence.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Who's the Victim? Rebecca Is One of a Growing Number of 'Honeytrap' Women Who Earn Their Living Tempting Husbands for Suspicious Wives. Morally Wrong or Merely Exposing Cheats? You Decide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.