HELO Focuses on Strengthening Policy Efforts at Meeting

By Leo, Lita | Nation's Cities Weekly, July 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

HELO Focuses on Strengthening Policy Efforts at Meeting


Leo, Lita, Nation's Cities Weekly


Hispanic Elected Local Officials (HELO) focused on strengthening the group's policy efforts and stature during a recent meeting.

Led by HELO President Liberato "Libby" Silva, vice mayor, Flagstaff, N.M., HELO members convened their annual Summer Board of Directors Meeting in conjunction with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

NLC President Anthony A. Williams, mayor of Washington, D.C., was a keynote speaker at the NALEO conference and was also present at the HELO Board meeting.

He briefed HELO and NALEO members on NLC policy issues, including No Child Left Behind, transportation and eminent domain, which recently reached the Supreme Court and resulted in a victory for cities across America.

Williams also lauded HELO's leadership and reaffirmed his support of NLC constituency groups.

"I salute your leadership within National League of Cities. NLC is committed to strengthening the relationship between NLC and HELO," said Williams. "We value constituency groups and we recognize that they play a vital role in increasing membership within NLC, so I thank you, HELO, for strengthening an indispensable relationship."

"I think HELO has made great progress as it relates to the National League of Cities and I thank Mayor Williams for that. He heard, loud and clear, our challenges in getting Latino representation on the NLC Board," said Carol Alvarado mayor pro tern Houston, Tex. "HELO really stepped up to that plate. But, we still have more work ahead of us and I don't want to stop now."

The NALEO conference convenes one of the largest gatherings of Hispanic elected and appointed officials and consists of various workshops and public policy priorities along with briefings and issues forums on a variety of issues in the Hispanic community such as: Early Childhood Education; Obesity; The Latino Vote in 2004; No Child Left Behind; The Latino Elderly; healthcare; financial literacy; and sessions on Puerto Rico's history, economic factors, and the Puerto Rico-U.S. relationship.

For the past 10 years, HELO has held its Board meetings in conjunction with NALEO's Annual Summer Conference. Each year, the HELO President is allotted a seat on the NALEO Board of Advisors.

Silva, HELO First Vice President Joe Maestas, councilmember, Espanola, N.M., Carol Alvarado, mayor pro tern, Houston, Tex., and Andres Ayala, councilmember, Bridgeport, Conn. sit on the NALEO Board of Advisors. HELO Past President John Bueno, council president pro tem, Pontiac, Mich., is serving his second term as president of NALEO.

NALEO staff members Marcelo Gaete, senior director, programs, Los Angeles, Jose Carillo, director, constituency services, Los Angeles, and Larry Gonzalez, director, Washington, D.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

HELO Focuses on Strengthening Policy Efforts at Meeting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.