07/07 War on Britain: A Girl Died in My Arms. I Need to Find out Her Name So I Can Tell Her Family She Wasn't Alone - SURVIVOR STEVEN DESBOROUGH

The Mirror (London, England), July 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

07/07 War on Britain: A Girl Died in My Arms. I Need to Find out Her Name So I Can Tell Her Family She Wasn't Alone - SURVIVOR STEVEN DESBOROUGH


Byline: By DANIEL BOFFEY and AIDAN McGURRAN

A HERO survivor pictured in the wreck of the Aldgate Tube train told yesterday how he comforted a young woman as she lay dying in his arms.

Steven Desborough, 28, was shown on the front of yesterday's Daily Mirror as he watched a doctor tend to her.

Moments later the doctor left to look after others and asked Steven - who had climbed into the carriage to help victims - to cradle the woman. She died soon afterwards.

He contacted the Daily Mirror in a bid to find her loved ones and reassure them she passed away with people caring for her.

And he said: "I didn't know her name. Nobody does.

"I just want to know who she was and tell her family she was not alone, that people were there for her in her final moments."

The woman, in her 20s - most of whose clothes were blown off in the explosion - was slumped on the floor by the pole in the Daily Mirror picture.

Steven, a trained first-aider, said: "I'm not an expert but the doctor told me she had severe abdominal injuries.

"Her right wrist was broken, her left leg was badly cut and she was bleeding on the right side of her face.

"I held her head and tried to talk to her. She didn't reply, but I kept talking."

Steven, of Witham, Essex, was travelling to work when the bomb exploded at 8.51am on the Metropolitan Line train heading from Aldgate to Liverpool Street.

It was the first of the three London Underground explosions and one bus blast that rocked the capital.

He, luckily, escaped uninjured. "I was in the back carriage of the train," he said.

"The bomb went off and it shuddered to a sharp halt. We were all in the dark and there was smoke and dust everywhere.

"After a while we were ushered out of the train, through the dark and past the carriage where the bomb had been.

"We all had to clamber over the debris. The train was on a corner, so we couldn't see ahead of us.

"Everyone carried on walking past the carriage where the blast had been. I peered in and shouted whether anyone needed any help."

He saw the carnage for himself. Seven were killed in the blast and the force of the explosion peeled back metal on the inside and outside of carriages.

"There were bodies and limbs all over the place," he said. "Every seat had been taken, so it was full. There was a man reeling on the ground and bits of people everywhere.

"Two seats had been blown out, which you can see in the picture.

"I heard someone shout 'Help! …

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07/07 War on Britain: A Girl Died in My Arms. I Need to Find out Her Name So I Can Tell Her Family She Wasn't Alone - SURVIVOR STEVEN DESBOROUGH
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