07/07 War on Britain: I'll Not Be Rewriting the Way That I Live

The Mirror (London, England), July 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

07/07 War on Britain: I'll Not Be Rewriting the Way That I Live


Byline: By BILL BORROWS

THIS IS the third time I have tried to write this column.

In a dramatic break with tradition I started early and the first attempt was all about London failing to get the Olympics in 2012.

The second, after the news from Singapore, was a hastily-rewritten and sneering little piece about the marathon being replaced by the Lambeth Walk and cockle picking becoming an Olympic event.

It was informed by the general dislike for the capital city that comes as naturally as breathing to most Northerners.

And then... well, you know what happened next. Thursday happened. The Natural Blonde was drying her hair, and both late for work, when news came through on the radio of a power surge on the underground that had caused an explosion.

The hairdryer clicked off. We all know what 'an explosion' at rush hour in a major city means. At that stage, however, there had just been an explosion. It was probably nothing.

The Natural Blonde switched her hair dryer back on and asked for a lift to Vauxhall station as she considered the options for getting across London.

A 10 minute taxi ride away, concussed and confused commuters were choking on the soot a terrorist bomb had released into the tube station at Liverpool Street, while those who were able to walk or run were engaged in a headlong rush up fire escapes toward daylight. …

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