07/07: War on Britain: She's Called Davinia. I Think She Is 28.she Has a Really Beautiful Face but Her Burns Are Very Bad. She Was So Brave - RESCUER PAUL DADGE

The Mirror (London, England), July 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

07/07: War on Britain: She's Called Davinia. I Think She Is 28.she Has a Really Beautiful Face but Her Burns Are Very Bad. She Was So Brave - RESCUER PAUL DADGE


Byline: By ANDY LINES and REID SEXTON

HE was the brave Tube-bomb rescuer who helped the "woman in the mask".

It put his picture on the front page of the Mirror - and summed up the selfless courage of Londoners.

Yesterday, ex-fireman Paul Dadge recalled how he became caught up in the Edgware Road bombing - and spoke movingly of the burns victim he knows only as "Davinia".

He said: "I believe she was 28. She had serious burns to her face and her hair was burned.

"She was probably one of the most seriously injured who wasn't a fatality.

"She really is a beautiful lady, really beautiful. She wasn't British and she told me she had a boyfriend.

"She was very brave, but I think she would have been OK. I certainly hope she is.

"She had a beautiful face... a really beautiful face. I hope she gets better.

"I believe she was taken to St Mary's Hospital. I'd love to get in touch with her and find out how she is."

Paul added: "I know I was photographed with Davinia but I probably spent as much time helping several other people.

"I'm not a hero. I just did what I could to help."

Paul, 28, was on the Tube himself on Thursday morning, heading to his job as a project manager with AOL.

Davinia had been on board a train at Edgware Road when the explosion happened, and made it to ground level.

Paul said: "I was going from King's Cross to Hammersmith. We stopped at Baker Street.

"We groaned, got off and started walking.

"I came across injured passengers after we'd left the station and got on to the Edgware Road." The blast at the station there, at 9.17, was on the Circle Line and was so powerful that three trains were hit.

Paul, originally from Cannock, Staffs, said of the scene in the street: "There were an awful lot of people there. Staff from a nearby Marks & Spencer helped and we took the injured into the Metropole hotel.

"I just basically tried to carry out basic triage to assess their injuries. …

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07/07: War on Britain: She's Called Davinia. I Think She Is 28.she Has a Really Beautiful Face but Her Burns Are Very Bad. She Was So Brave - RESCUER PAUL DADGE
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