STALLONE ON BOXING, BRAIN TRAINING.. AND A BIG COMEBACK; I Will Fight to Get Rocky Back in the Ring

The Mirror (London, England), July 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

STALLONE ON BOXING, BRAIN TRAINING.. AND A BIG COMEBACK; I Will Fight to Get Rocky Back in the Ring


Byline: By JUSTINE SMITH in Las Vegas

AS SYLVESTER Stallone describes the punishing brain-training sessions he puts his three young daughters through every morning, I scrutinise him for any sign that he is joking.

But Botox and the scalpel appear to have joined forces to make his square, wrinkle-free face as expressive as granite, a tight smile curling around the edge of his lips and his eyes doing the talking from behind a wood-stain tan mask.

In his gravelly New York-Sicilian drawl, he tells me: "I get them up early in the morning and we have 40 minutes. They play piano for 10 minutes, then recite for 10 minutes, shoot billiards for 10 minutes, swing a golf club for 10 minutes, then punch mitts for 10 minutes."

As that makes 50 minutes, he might want to leave maths to the teachers. "Even the youngest?" I ask him - his fifth-born, Scarlett Rose, turns three this week. "Oh, yeah, all of them," he says.

"Some people might consider it extreme, but neurologists say by the time you are 10 or 11 you have formed a lot of habits. The more you open them up at a young age, the more stimulated their neurons become. I think it's great for a woman to play billiards, don't you?"

For the same reason, they are only allowed to watch TV in Spanish. He is being deadly serious. No time for fun.

"I just want to give them what my parents couldn't give me," he explains. "Options." However, he fears the hothouse training may be to no avail. "Unfortunately, I think they are going to go into the theatre, which is a shallow existence," he complains, shaking his head.

Acting has certainly worked for him, despite his limited repertoire, largely because of his admirable grit, determination and hard work.

Stallone is always quick to boast that it took him three days to write Rocky, the 1976 Oscar winner that made him an instant star.

He once said: "I'm astounded by people who take 18 years to write something. That's how long it took that guy to write Madame Bovary, and was that ever on the best-seller list?"

With a little dramatic licence, Stallone was writing his own life story: emotionally scarred working class kid overcomes seemingly insurmountable odds to become an all-American hero.

He was born into adversity. His familiar drawl and drooping eyes are due to the partial facial paralysis he suffered in a traumatic forceps delivery. He is still sensitive about it, insisting he is photographed from his "good" side.

His dad Frank, a hairdresser, was a bully, who Stallone says left him with a lingering sense of inadequacy that might help explain his tunnel-vision drive to be the best.

As he moved between Frank, his chorus girl mum Jackie and foster homes, destiny appeared to have dealt him a losing hand.

He was expelled from 14 schools, and at 15 his classmates at a school for troubled boys voted him the one "most likely to end up in the electric chair".

But he won a scholarship to study drama in Switzerland and worked as a jobbing actor, including a porn movie that saw him dubbed The Italian Stallion.

Then he hit the big time as Rocky Balboa. He insisted on playing the role himself despite pressure from studios who wanted to cast an established star. Thirty years later, he returned to boxing for his successful foray into reality TV, The Contender.

The pounds 1. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

STALLONE ON BOXING, BRAIN TRAINING.. AND A BIG COMEBACK; I Will Fight to Get Rocky Back in the Ring
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.