Exploring Alternative Pathways out of Poverty: Making Connections between Domestic Violence and Employment Practices

By Costello, Mayet; Chung, Donna et al. | Australian Journal of Social Issues, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

Exploring Alternative Pathways out of Poverty: Making Connections between Domestic Violence and Employment Practices


Costello, Mayet, Chung, Donna, Carson, Ed, Australian Journal of Social Issues


Introduction

In comparison to similar English-speaking countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, Australia's neglect of the connections between services and practices in the fields of domestic violence and employment is notable (1). In the international literature the intersections of domestic violence, homelessness, poverty and employment have been examined both in research and practice. Solutions to the problems and complexities identified are being developed, trialed and discussed in the literature. In stark contrast there is a dearth of Australian literature and policy on the intersection of domestic violence and employment.

In Australian research the links between domestic violence, poverty and homelessness for women and children affected by domestic violence have been clearly established (Chung et al 2000; and Wensing et al 2003: 17). Similarly, the relationship between employment and poverty is apparent in Australian literature, with skilled employment, considered a major pathway out of poverty and homelessness (Macdonald and Siemon 2000: 215). Despite these linkages dominant approaches to domestic violence in Australian social service provision have been crisis oriented and focused on providing accommodation, welfare assistance, and emergency support services to women and children (Chung et al 2000: 2). Services have not been funded to have a role in systemic planning such as job search and training to assist providing accommodation and financial security that is more a living wage and independent of social service agencies. Further, anecdotal evidence and our professional experience suggests the reluctance of women affected by domestic violence to disclose these experiences to employment agencies means that its impact on women's ability to seek or maintain employment is likely to be underestimated.

As practitioners and researchers we were intrigued by this apparent disregard of the connections between domestic violence and employment and queried whether the research, knowledge, and practice emerging from the international literature had any relevance to the Australian context. Subsequently, we conducted an exploratory study of the intersection of these issues in Australia to examine whether the international literature had any applicability to local practice. We also intended that this approach would identify any current innovative Australian practices on the intersection of domestic violence and employment in the field. In this context the research findings we present offer a unique contribution to knowledge and practice for these two important Australian social issues.

Methodology

The methodology was two-fold: a literature review and qualitative semi-structured interviews with workers from metropolitan Adelaide. The literature surveyed the intersection of domestic violence and employment, primarily originating from the United States and to a lesser extent the United Kingdom. Although there was a paucity of Australian literature on the intersection of these issues, literature from Australia on domestic violence, employment, homelessness, poverty and welfare as separate topics was also examined to assist in understanding local nuances.

As this was a small exploratory study the collection of data was aimed at examining whether these intersections were being identified and/or addressed in local domestic violence and employment program practices. Study participants were workers recruited from four agencies: specialist domestic violence counselling service; specialist domestic violence accommodation service; job network provider; and employment service. Being an exploratory study we did not seek a representative sample in our research. Rather, we decided to approach two specialist domestic violence agencies and two specialist employment agencies that provided a small cross-section of agencies working in this area. We also deliberately selected agencies that came into contact with women at different stages in their experience of domestic violence (that is, current experience, recent separation, and historic separation). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Exploring Alternative Pathways out of Poverty: Making Connections between Domestic Violence and Employment Practices
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.