Collective Bargaining in 1993: Jobs Are the Issue

By Williamson, Lisa M. | Monthly Labor Review, January 1993 | Go to article overview

Collective Bargaining in 1993: Jobs Are the Issue


Williamson, Lisa M., Monthly Labor Review


Contract negotiations for almost 2.8 million workers under 669 major collective bargaining agreements are scheduled for 1993. This year's bargaining will involve slightly more than one-third of the 8.2 million workers covered by all major labor agreements (those with 1,000 or more workers) in private industry and State and local governments. Workers in private industry make up almost three-fourths (2 million) of all workers covered by agreements set to expire or reopen in 1993. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The 2 million private industry workers for whom contract talks are scheduled during the year account for one-third of all private industry workers under major agreements. Slightly more than one-half of the private industry workers scheduled for 1993 negotiations are employed in nonmanufacturing industries, chiefly transportation equipment (26 percent of the workers), construction (21 percent), retail trade (10 percent), and trucking (7 percent). Although accounting for only 4 percent of private industry workers under expiring agreements, all major contracts in bituminous coal mining and petroleum refining are up for renegotiation in 1993.

In State and local government, 244 major contracts, coveting 735,000 workers, will expire or reopen in 1993. Negotiations will cover 431,000 employees in local governments and 304,000 employees in State governments. One-fifth of all public sector workers covered by expiring or reopening agreements are employed by three States: Pennsylvania, Hawaii, and Minnesota.

Information in this article concerning 1993 negotiations is based on data available to the Bureau of Labor Statistics as of September 30, 1992. Settlements that occurred in the fourth quarter of 1992, but are scheduled to expire or reopen this year, would affect the proportion of workers up for negotiations in 1993.

In State and local government, for example, about 1.3 million workers were under agreements that expired before October 1, 1992, and had not been renegotiated. Another 87,000 workers were under State and local government bargaining agreements scheduled to expire or reopen in the fourth quarter of 1992. In the unlikely event that all of these contracts were settled before the end of 1992 and called for termination or reopening during 1993, bargaining activity for the year in State and local government would be increased substantially. The bargaining agenda will also include negotiations that began in 1992 or earlier and that continued into 1993.

Several economic factors will affect negotiations in 1993. Many analysts are concerned about the ability of the economy to generate new jobs, so the employment outlook for the economy as a whole, as well as for particular geographic regions and industries, will influence negotiators. Expectations concerning the rate of inflation may also affect negotiating positions.

Another issue expected to be on the minds of many bargainers is the effect of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) reached last August and awaiting final approval from Congress.(1) The pact is designed to eliminate tariffs and trade barriers for goods produced in Canada, the United States, and Mexico and sold among these nations. Supporters say that net U.S. job growth can be expected in the long term, as the demand for U.S. goods increases; detractors believe that high-paying manufacturing jobs will be moved to lower wage areas in Mexico.

Bargaining environment

Recent changes in compensation. The recent trend in wage and benefit changes will likely be noted by the parties at the bargaining table in 1993. According to the Bureau's Employment Cost Index, in private industry and State and local government, employers' costs for employee compensation (wages, salaries, and benefits) rose 3.5 percent in the year ended September 1992, the smallest over-the-year increase since 1987. The 1991-92 rise in wages and salaries (2.7 percent) reflected the smallest 12-month rise since the data were first tabulated in 1982. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Collective Bargaining in 1993: Jobs Are the Issue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.