Framework for World Government: From the Moment State Department Planners in the Roosevelt Administration Began Crafting Plans for the United Nations, Their Goal Was Always the Same: World Government

By Behreandt, Dennis | The New American, July 11, 2005 | Go to article overview

Framework for World Government: From the Moment State Department Planners in the Roosevelt Administration Began Crafting Plans for the United Nations, Their Goal Was Always the Same: World Government


Behreandt, Dennis, The New American


The United Nations has been portrayed as the world's most important humanitarian organization. The propaganda supporting this view has been continuous for so long that few doubt the depiction. When disasters such as the devastating Asian tsunami occur, the UN and its pundits are quick to position the world body in the limelight with pronouncements depicting the organization as the leading supplier and coordinator of relief and aid.

Such a picture of the UN as merely a helpful relief and humanitarian agency is dangerously deceptive and inaccurate. It is true that the world body does participate in relief efforts when disasters occur, but this is only the public face of the organization. A clear-eyed survey of the makeup of the UN, though, finds that the world body is much more than a relief organization. It has, for instance, a clearly delineated executive branch in the office of the secretary-general. It has a similarly delineated legislative branch in the General Assembly and Security Council. And it has subsidiaries and affiliates, like the World Court, the nascent International Criminal Court, and certain tribunals, that function as a judiciary branch.

Those familiar with the composition of governing bodies will recognize in this structure the basic framework of government. And this is precisely what the United Nations is and always has been. In fact, from the very moment of its birth during and immediately following the great upheaval of World War II, the true purp6se of the United Nations has been obscured. Born in secrecy while the world convulsed in the violence of war, the founders of the world body, primarily found in the subversive and internationalist ranks of the Council on Foreign Relations, labored to lay the groundwork for world government. The United Nations was designed from the beginning to be the instrument through which they would achieve this dangerous goal.

Prewar Planning

On December 22, 1941, just two weeks after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, British and U.S. officials met in Washington, D.C., to discuss matters pertaining to war. The discussions, dubbed the Arcadia Conference, lasted until January 14, 1942. During the talks, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill pushed for aggressive military action and agreed with U.S. officials and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on a "beat Germany first" strategy. Roosevelt, for his part, began immediately to lay the groundwork for the post-war world by presenting a draft for a "Declaration of the United Nations."

This early declaration was perceived at the time as providing the Allied powers with a formal, unified front from which to face the dangers posed by Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan, and the other Axis nations. Nevertheless, it contained in broad outline the foundation for what would become the world body. The fact that the draft declaration was available just a few short weeks after the bombing of Pearl Harbor suggests that the document had, in fact, been in the works for some time prior to the entry of the United States into the war.

In fact, work to lay the foundation for a new international order had begun some years earlier and was carried out by key Roosevelt adviser Sumner Welles. A devotee of former President Wilson, Welles was a dedicated internationalist and member at a young age of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). The CFR was an outgrowth of efforts to form a new international order after the failure by the Wilson administration to get us into the League of Nations. Since that time, the CFR has pushed the world government line.

In 1937 Welles, then undersecretary of state, proposed what came to be called his "American System" through which he thought it would be possible to create "a new world order." According to the book Sumner Welles, Postwar Planning, and the Quest for a New World Order, 1937-1943 by Christopher D. O' Sullivan, professor of history at the University of San Francisco, Welles proposed that Roosevelt "call for sweeping arms reductions, the lowering of international trade barriers and the unity of the neutral powers in quarantining aggressor nations. …

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