Ukraine Creeps Westwards as Russia Looks On: The Electoral Victory of the Westward-Leaning 'Orange Revolution' in Ukraine's Elections Is Reshaping Europe's Economic and Political Landscape. Many Believe Ukraine May Even Leapfrog Turkey to Become a Member of the EU

By Inozemtsev, Vladislav | European Business Forum, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Ukraine Creeps Westwards as Russia Looks On: The Electoral Victory of the Westward-Leaning 'Orange Revolution' in Ukraine's Elections Is Reshaping Europe's Economic and Political Landscape. Many Believe Ukraine May Even Leapfrog Turkey to Become a Member of the EU


Inozemtsev, Vladislav, European Business Forum


Last December, Viktor Yushchenko was elected president of Ukraine, changing the post-Soviet political landscape with as much force as the tsunami that struck South-east Asia the same day.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

President Putin had staked his prestige on defeating Yushchenko, and $600m of Russian cash was invested to ensure it would happen. But rival Viktor Yanukovich was decisively beaten, and with his defeat went any illusions of future Russian influence on the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Putin's dashed hopes for his man in Ukraine were captured by Anders Aslund, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, in his recent testimony before the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations: "Mr. Putin proved himself poorly informed, anti-democratic, anti-western and ineffective."

The implications are profound for the political status quo in Europe and for future trends of western investment in the region. Suddenly there is a large former Soviet republic looking to Brussels for future membership in the European Community, and Brussels is listening. Ukraine may even become an EU member before Turkey.

Should Yushchenko's success have surprised us? Perhaps. Last summer, when I interviewed him, just before he was poisoned, I did so because I dreamed of--rather than expected--victory for his 'hopeless cause'. He was confident, expansive and impressive but I couldn't imagine him over-coming pressures from Moscow.

And yet he declared his vision unequivocally: "I have never had any doubt that Ukraine is a European country. I am a Euro-optimist," he told me.

Shortly after the interview appeared in Svobodnaya Mysl (Free Thought), pro-Kremlin 'spin-doctor' Vyacheslav Nikonov rang to say he pitied me, noting that he saw no sense in trying to change something that was predetermined.

A bit later in Washington, I had occasion to meet with former US National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski. He told me he shared my enthusiasm for Yushchenko but felt that a democratic movement in Ukraine was rather more wishful than probable.

During the 15 years since the break-up of the USSR, Ukraine was not taken seriously, although its people and institutions have developed faster and further than Russia.

* Unlike Russia, Ukraine fielded at least 10 political parties in this election, each of which enjoyed remarkable popular support.

* Unlike Russia, the survival of Ukrainian business has depended not on the distribution of government licences on natural resources development, but on modernisation of industry.

* Unlike Russia, both independent media and relatively independent judiciary have been established in Ukraine.

Why did these two countries take two completely different paths? First, Ukraine has a very different history from that of Russia. For centuries Russians saw themselves belonging to a huge power on a continental scale, surrounded by satellites and foes. The logic of the Russian attitude to neighbouring states was shaped by a crucial question: are they with us or against us?

Ukraine, a much smaller country with no experience of genuine independence, was finding its way forward via alliances with Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Germany, and even Sweden. So the logic of Ukrainian attitude to the major powers of Europe was shaped by another question: who are we with, and who are we against?

This difference makes it easy for the new Ukraininan leadership to talk about joining the EU, while the Russian elite continues to speculate upon securing its 'sphere of interests' in the fight against networks of people with no positive programme--labelling them instead as international terrorists.

Another factor is Ukraine's economic development. Once again, unlike Russia, Ukraine is not rich in resources, so Ukraine needs to capitalise on the creativity of its people and the professionalism of its government and managerial class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ukraine Creeps Westwards as Russia Looks On: The Electoral Victory of the Westward-Leaning 'Orange Revolution' in Ukraine's Elections Is Reshaping Europe's Economic and Political Landscape. Many Believe Ukraine May Even Leapfrog Turkey to Become a Member of the EU
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.