CAFTA, Codex, and the War against Vitamins

The New American, August 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

CAFTA, Codex, and the War against Vitamins


One purpose of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), according to the preamble to the pact, would be to define the "respective rights and obligations" of its member nations (including the United States) "under the ... agreement establishing the World Trade Organization." Put more simply, CAFTA--like the European Union--would be a regional administrative unit of a global economic system supervised by the WTO.

Many Americans don't regard that prospect to be particularly alarming, since they can't see how it affects their daily lives. A recent ruling by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in Rome offers a useful--and outrageous--illustration of the immediate effect that WTO-imposed regulations can have on everyday life.

Established by the UN in 1961, the commission "establishes guidelines to harmonize trade in food," in the words of a European news agency. In early July, the commission approved a regulatory framework that would eventually phaseout over-the-counter sales of vitamins, minerals, herbs, and other food-based nutritional aids. As Britain's DeHavilland News Service reported on July 7, the commission's ruling was buttressed by a ruling by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) intended to "restrict the sale of supplements and ... set upper limits of vitamin doses. Once fully implemented, the new measures laid out in the EU supplements directive will mean that supplements can only be taken from an approved list ... which will effectively license vitamins in the same way as normal medicines."

Prior to creation of the WTO, the Codex Commission was an utterly toothless institution.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CAFTA, Codex, and the War against Vitamins
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.