I'm Not as Much of a Baby as You Think; Tradition Has It That Babies Don't Worry about Much. but Research Shows Their Emotions May Be More Grown-Up Than We Realise

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

I'm Not as Much of a Baby as You Think; Tradition Has It That Babies Don't Worry about Much. but Research Shows Their Emotions May Be More Grown-Up Than We Realise


Byline: By Samantha Booth

BABIES never seem to have much on their minds.

As long as they are fed regularly, changed when they need it and have a shoulder to vomit on when the occasion arises, we think of them as being pretty happy.

But scientific studies show that infants as young as four months can experience adult emotions.

Psychologists now believe babies could be feeling empathy or even jealousy.

They also think babies can suffer stress through missing an absent parent.

One study has shown that babies younger than six months react to different facial expressions.

Another research team found that when a baby is played recordings of other young children crying, they will turn on the waterworks.

Yet when they are played tapes of their own screaming, tears dry up.

New York University psychologist Professor Martin Hoffman says the research proves that 'rudimentary empathy is in place right from birth'.

Scientists hope the research could lead to earlier diagnoses of autism and some learning difficulties.

We asked writer Lisa Adams, mother of Rebecca, 19 months, if she agreed with the findings.

FACIAL RECOGNITION From four months old, babies start to use a part of their brain called the fusiform gyrus which allows them to tell the difference between strangers and carers.This is key to building trust.

Lisa said: 'Rebecca definitely recognised faces from very early on, especially me, her dad and gran.

'But it also quickly developed into her not wanting to go to people she was less familiar with

MENTAL IMAGES

Babies use the front part of their brain called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to remember faces and images, which is why they can experience stress from as young as eight months old when parents break up.

Lisa said: 'I would definitely agree with this as Rebecca would get quite fretful at around this age if we were away for any length of time

MEMORY

A part of the brain called the hippocampus drives a baby's memory and is one of the most crucial parts of the brain. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

I'm Not as Much of a Baby as You Think; Tradition Has It That Babies Don't Worry about Much. but Research Shows Their Emotions May Be More Grown-Up Than We Realise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.