Conservative, Popular Judge Named for Court

The Christian Century, August 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

Conservative, Popular Judge Named for Court


President Bush nominated a strong conservative, federal appellate judge John Roberts, to replace retiring moderate justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court.

After the announcement July 19, activists on both sides of the nation's cultural debates agreed that the move signaled Bush's intent to shift the ideological balance on the nation's highest court further to the right--possibly for decades.

Roberts, 50, a Catholic, has been a member of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit--generally thought of as the second most important federal court--since 2003. Previously, he served in private law practice in Washington, as well as stints in the administrations of Bush's father and President Ronald Reagan.

Introducing Roberts to the nation in a prime-time address from the White House, President Bush said Roberts "has profound respect for the rule of law and for the liberties guaranteed to every citizen" and that, as a justice, Roberts would "strictly apply the Constitution and laws, not legislate from the bench."

Roberts, in response, noted that he had often argued cases before the high court in his career as an attorney. "That experience left me with a profound appreciation for the role of the court in our constitutional democracy and a deep regard for the court as an institution," he said.

Roberts's nomination moves to the Senate, which has been torn by ideological and partisan debates over some of Bush's picks for lower federal courts. Bush has said his goal is to have the new justice in place by the time the Supreme Court begins its 2005-2006 term on October 3, but Democrats have signaled that they won't be bound by Bush's timeline.

Republican senators offered mostly high praise for Roberts, who holds sufficiently conservative credentials. Democrats were generally cautious at first, not wanting to appear as if they were immediately attacking Bush's choice. But interest groups concerned with social issues offered stronger language.

"With the Roberts nomination, the fight to privacy and the future of a fair-minded court are in grave danger," said Joe Solmonese, executive director of the gay-rights group Human Rights Campaign, in a statement issued about 20 minutes before Roberts's nomination even became official. …

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Conservative, Popular Judge Named for Court
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