Who Hired This Person?

By Hewitt, Debra Y. | Records Management Quarterly, October 1992 | Go to article overview
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Who Hired This Person?


Hewitt, Debra Y., Records Management Quarterly


When you have received poor service from a company employee, don't you usually question why the person has a job? Translation: Who hired this person?

In some cases, managers have been conditioned in their response to the hiring process. They may believe that turnover is natural, and that to spend a lot of time with the process would be useless. That attitude may result from their perceptions of the job functions to be performed. Do any of the following phrases sound familiar?

* Any arm body can do that job.

* It doesn't take a rocket scientist to do the job.

* It's a monkey-see-monkey-do job.

We have to look (manage) beyond the tasks associated with job performance when we make staffing decisions. The person who does the hiring needs to understand the job to be performed and, more importantly, the possible impacts of non-performance. In today's competitive lower market, high-quality customer service can be impacted by everyone in the organization, whether they have direct contact with outside customers or not. Think about the relationships your departmental employees have and ask as many "what if" questions as you can.

Employee selection will determine how well your departmental operations work. Therefore, the procedures you go through to select employees need to be through and well documented.

KNOW THE JOB TO BE FILLED

Before you can begin to look for a replacement or additional employee, you must first know what the job is. A good way to become familiar or reacquaint yourself is to review and possibly revise the job description.

Reviewing the job description nay necessitate spending time with someone who is currently performing the job. Check off the tasks as they are performed. Make notes as to whether new technology has had an impact; list functions and responsibilities which have been added since the last review of the job description.

The job description is the most important piece of documentation in the employment process. It is the basis for determining the qualifications and requirements necessary to fill the position, developing a training program, setting performance objectives, and determining proper staffing levels.

An effective job description communicates:

* Relationships--how does the incumbent report to and who reports to the incumbent

* Summary--an overview of what will be accomplished

* Functional Responsibilities--the tasks to be performed

* Qualifications--the educational, physical ability and skill requirements necessary to perform the job.

THE SEARCH

Once you have an updated job description, you begin recruiting or soliciting applications. There are a number of options which include:

* Newspaper ads--be clear and concise as to what you are looking for. This will eliminate your having to read a mountain of applications to find those who are viable candidates.

* Public employment agencies--these agencies may do some of the preliminary screening and testing for you.

* Social Services Organizations--for example, those providing vocational rehabilitation.

* Schools-Guidance offices--may have lists of students.

* Qualified Applicants--who were not chosen previously.

* Intercompany jog postings--may turn up employees from other departments.

* Former Employees--those who left in good standing. If they aren't interested in coming back to work, they may know someone else would be a good candidate.

* Networking--through professional organizations; trade publications.

PRE-SCREENING

From the pool of applicants, you can begin by conducting a telephone, or preliminary screening, interview. Speaking with applicants on the phone may give an idea of which ones you would like to have continue the employment process.

Most organizations require applicants to come in and complete an application form. Although the application is a legal document maintained by the Human Resources Department, you may be able to suggest pertinent questions to add (i.

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