MOLODETS! OTLICHNO; (That's Russian for Well Done, Love FOUR YEARS AGO, ANA COULDN'T SPEAK A WORD OF ENGLISH. TODAY, SHE'S PASSED 11 GCSEs WITH SIX OF THEM AT 'A' GRADE

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), August 25, 2005 | Go to article overview
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MOLODETS! OTLICHNO; (That's Russian for Well Done, Love FOUR YEARS AGO, ANA COULDN'T SPEAK A WORD OF ENGLISH. TODAY, SHE'S PASSED 11 GCSEs WITH SIX OF THEM AT 'A' GRADE


Byline: By JANE WOODHEAD Education Reporter

THE number of Merseyside students scoring top GCSE grades rose again this year.

Knowsley saw a huge improvement in grade A to C passes, with 72% in some schools.

At St Edmund Arrowsmith RC high school in Whiston, the most improved in the borough, the number of children with five or more A to C passes, rose from 53% last year to 72%.

In St Helens, the overall pass rate rose by 7%.

The overall percentage improvement in Wirral, Liverpool and Sefton was unconfirmed but education officials were confident of a significant increase.

Nationally the continuing rise in top grades has again led to calls for an overhaul of the exam system, with some experts proposing scrapping GCSEs in favour of diplomas ANA Kholodkova could not speak a word of English when she arrived in Merseyside from Russia four years ago.

But today the 16-year-old learned she had achieved 11 GCSEs including an A grade in English.

As well as learning a new language, Ana also had to cope with the death of her stepfather Michael from cancer on the last day of her exams.

Ana, from South Wirral high school, achieved six A grades - English language and literature, art, German, maths and religious studies - and gained B grades in graphics and IT and a C in double science.

She also took her AS exam in Russian a year early, achieving a grade A.

Ana said it was extremely difficult for her when she arrived in Wirral having left all of her family and friends behind.

"My mum married an Englishman and came over to England so I obviously came with her.

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MOLODETS! OTLICHNO; (That's Russian for Well Done, Love FOUR YEARS AGO, ANA COULDN'T SPEAK A WORD OF ENGLISH. TODAY, SHE'S PASSED 11 GCSEs WITH SIX OF THEM AT 'A' GRADE
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