Animal-Rights Activism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 25, 2005 | Go to article overview

Animal-Rights Activism


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Contrary to the portrayal in Doug Bandow's recent opinion column ("Animal terrorism," Op-Ed, Monday), People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals does not support violence of any sort, even while countering the phenomenal violence committed against animals in the food, leather and fur, entertainment and experimentation industries. Nor has PETA provided money for any violent action.

Mr. Bandow would serve readers better if he bothered to make even one phone call to our office or visited just one of the cruel places PETA has exposed - say, a slaughterhouse where cattle have their hoofs cut off while still alive, a wretched fur farm where a fox sits with his leg bone exposed and infected, or a laboratory like one at the University of North Carolina where an experimenter cut conscious animals' heads off with scissors.

Perhaps then he would understand that everything PETA does, from our humane education campaigns, protests and street-theater type demonstrations to our work with district attorneys and law enforcement officials to stop cruelty and bring criminals to justice, is to protest and eliminate the suffering of animals.

Mr. Bandow also failed to mention the amount of good work PETA does every day. We work with local authorities in communities across the country to rescue animals from deplorable conditions. We sterilize dogs and cats at low or no cost.

We distribute donated fur coats to the homeless, the only people who have any excuse to wear fur. We have persuaded McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's and others to improve the treatment of animals killed for their restaurants. We supply computer programs in schools to replace frogs and cats.

We help people adopt humane solutions to problems with geese, beavers and other wildlife that have nowhere to go, and much more. Thanks to whistleblowers, PETA has placed undercover investigators in facilities across the country, leading to exposure of abuse and criminal charges against the people who harm animals.

Most misleading was Mr. Bandow's dismissal of the reasons behind PETA's peaceful campaigns against practices at KFC and the Covance Inc. pharmaceutical testing company. Investigations of KFC fast-food restaurant suppliers exposed employees torturing chickens.

Video footage taken by an undercover PETA investigator at a Pilgrim's Pride chicken processing plant in West Virginia shows workers stomping on live chickens, kicking them and flinging them full force at walls and floors. The investigator also witnessed employees twisting the heads off live chickens and, in Charles Manson-style, writing on the wall with their blood.

He saw them spit tobacco into the birds' eyes and mouths, spray-paint their faces and tie their legs together, apparently just because they thought it was funny. (See KFCCruelty.com.)

Covance, a billion-dollar international drug-testing company headquartered in New Jersey, is paid by pharmaceutical giants to test their drug formulations on macaque monkeys.

Former PETA investigator Lisa Leitten worked for nearly a year at Covance's Virginia laboratory and documented abuse that violates federal animal protection laws.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Animal-Rights Activism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.