Worst Natural Disaster in United States' History; Scores Killed by Hurricane Katrina

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 31, 2005 | Go to article overview

Worst Natural Disaster in United States' History; Scores Killed by Hurricane Katrina


Byline: BY VICTORIA WARD

AN URGENT appeal for financial aid was made last night as the United States began to come to terms with the true extent of the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina.

In what could prove to be the worst natural disaster ever to hit the US, an estimated 80 people have been killed. It is feared that number will rise.

Hundreds of thousands of people across Louisiana and Mississippi have been made homeless as distressing images of the storm-hit area are beamed around the world.

Several observers have said the area looks like a "war zone".

Described as a "truly catastrophic event", the storm turned much of the Gulf coast into a refuge camp, having ripped up homes and turned streets to rivers awash with debris.

Martial law was declared in New Orleans where bodies were seen floating in the water and looting was rife. Some 80% of the city was submerged. Michael Brown, the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has assessed the devastation, said the flood damage was the worst he had ever seen.

He said that the organisation was preparing to house "at least tens of thousands of victims for literally months on end".

President George Bush cut short his summer holiday to return to Washington to monitor recovery efforts.

Hundreds of people were stranded on rooftops, desperately screaming for help.

Many smashed their way out using axes and others simply did not make it, with several reports of bodies seen floating in the water. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Worst Natural Disaster in United States' History; Scores Killed by Hurricane Katrina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.