Europe Insists: We Can't Kick out the Preachers of Hate; Proposals Ban Return of Asylum Seekers on Human Rights Grounds

Daily Mail (London), August 31, 2005 | Go to article overview

Europe Insists: We Can't Kick out the Preachers of Hate; Proposals Ban Return of Asylum Seekers on Human Rights Grounds


Byline: TIM SHIPMAN

NEW EU rules could block Britain's attempts to deport Islamic preachers of hate.

The European Commission is due to unveil proposals tomorrow banning the return of illegal immigrants and asylum seekers to countries where they might face human rights abuses.

The plans will be seized on by the lawyers of 50 extremist clerics who, under a Home Office blitz, are facing deportation to countries including Syria, Lebanon and Algeria.

Home Secretary Charles Clarke said the Government would target those who 'foment, justify or glorify' terrorism and clerics who 'foster hatred which might lead to intercommunity violence'.

Ministers are securing guarantees from Middle Eastern countries that they will not torture or execute suspects who are sent home, including Jordanian Abu Qatada, the preacher often described as Osama Bin Laden's ambassador in Europe.

But several of those targeted have already boasted that they are untouchable because their lawyers say the agreements are not worth the paper they are written on.

The EU rules, to be unveiled by Commission vice-president Franco Frattini, will establish minimum standards for the treatment of immigrants and asylum seekers.

They will create a further obstacle to the removal of the hate preachers and make it more difficult for the Government to circumvent human rights legislation.

A leaked copy of the EU directive makes clear that the Commission has decided against adding measures on expelling people who pose a security threat and called for existing laws to be used against suspects.

And it claimed, remarkably, that countries would be better off keeping their terror suspects under surveillance rather than deporting them.

'It may not always be in the interest of the state to expel a suspected terrorist. It may sometimes be preferable to bring criminal charges against such a person or to keep him under surveillance in a member state,' the document reads.

Ministers will have three months to decide whether to sign up to the new rules, but opting out would be an explosive move since Britain currently holds the revolving presidency of the EU. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Europe Insists: We Can't Kick out the Preachers of Hate; Proposals Ban Return of Asylum Seekers on Human Rights Grounds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.