Bush Endorses Teaching of 'Intelligent Design'

The Christian Century, August 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

Bush Endorses Teaching of 'Intelligent Design'


President Bush has endorsed the teaching of "intelligent design" along with natural selection in a roundtable interview with reporters from Texas newspapers. Bush said public school students should be exposed to the former theory, which posits that biological evidence suggests life is too complex to have evolved without an intelligent designer, presumably a divine Creator.

"I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought," Bush said in the August 1 interview, according to the Knight-Ridder news service. "[If] you're asking me whether or not people ought to be exposed to different ideas, the answer is yes," he continued.

Intelligent design is different from creationism, which seeks to disprove the entire theory of evolution in favor of a religious account of the origins of life. The theory has gained prominence in recent years as conservative Christians have encouraged its teaching in public schools.

The question about intelligent design arose on the same day that the Texas Freedom Network, a religious watchdog group on First Amendment issues, held a news conference to complain about a Bible study course promoted nationwide to school districts by a conservative organization, the National Council on Bible Curriculum in Public Schools, based in Greensboro, North Carolina. (See related story on page 18.)

In a review of the curriculum by Mark Chancey of Southern Methodist University for the Texas Freedom Network, the biblical studies professor said that, among other things, the discussions of science in the course draw upon the biblical account of creation. According to the network, 52 Texas school districts offer the class.

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