Worth Noting

By Gajewski, Karen Ann | The Humanist, September-October 2005 | Go to article overview

Worth Noting


Gajewski, Karen Ann, The Humanist


* The United States continues to impede efforts to reduce HIV/AIDS worldwide. It remains the only nation to explicitly ban federal funding of needle exchange programs, and now the Bush administration is demanding an "anti-prostitution pledge" of any foreign or U.S. organization that wants to receive anti-HIV/AIDS funding. Opponents of the pledge say it will make it nearly impossible to provide services or assistance to those most at risk of HIV/AIDS and it violates the freedom of speech for groups working with high-risk individuals.

* Access to abortion has taken some hits. Despite the United Nations' push for abortion to be decriminalized worldwide--particularly when a woman's health is in danger and in cases of rape and incest--Colombia instead increased its sentences for abortion from three years to four and a half. In Argentina, access to contraceptives and abortion is nearly impossible, and if a woman wants to be sterilized she must obtain her husband's consent, have already borne three children, and be older than thirty-five. And a new Florida law, in violation of the state constitution, requires doctors to notify parents forty-eight hours before performing an abortion on a minor.

* More than two dozen civil rights, religious, labor, and advocacy groups have urged the Department of Justice to block implementation of Georgia House Bill 244, arguing that it is discriminatory against minority voters. The new law requires photo I.D. and reduces acceptable forms of voter identification from seventeen to six. African Americans in Georgia are nearly five times less likely than whites to possess a drivers' license (one of the few approved IDs) and limited access to motor vehicle bureaus (one for every three counties) makes securing photo ID difficult.

* Another abuse of the Patriot Act occurred in June when the New York City suburb of Summit used the "anti-terrorism" law to force homeless people out of a local train station. Since its knee-jerk passage after 9/11, there have been numerous reports of the act being used to justify civil liberties violations--prompting hundreds of organizations and municipalities to pass referenda calling for its reform or repeal.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Worth Noting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.