Galleries, Museums Look East and West for Fall Exhibitions

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), September 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

Galleries, Museums Look East and West for Fall Exhibitions


Byline: Bob Keefer The Register-Guard

Art lovers will find a lot of the usual suspects and a few new ones in the coming season, with a big show of Asian art at the University of Oregon, a steady stream of local and regional artists coming to galleries in town and a blockbuster show of opulent German art headed for Portland.

The Hult Center's Jacobs Gallery kicks off the fall season, as usual, with the Mayor's Art Show, which opens Friday along with the Salon des Refuses, at DIVA, 110 W. Broadway. (See story, Page G5)

A selection of work from Oregon State University's Art About Agriculture collection follows at the Jacobs on Oct. 28; next up are two popular local artists, printmaker Eric Peterson and assemblage creator Beverly Soasey, on Dec. 9.

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon will look to the art of Asia this fall.

"Inside the Floating World," an exhibit of Japanese prints from the Lenore Wright collection, will open in the changing exhibition gallery Oct. 8 and run through Jan. 8.

Accompanying the exhibit will be Japanese prints from the Schnitzer collection and three related shows in the collections galleries, "Status and Authority in Imperial China," "Art and Everyday Life in Japan" and "Simple Pleasures."

In downtown Eugene, the Karin Clarke Gallery, 760 Willamette St., will revisit one of its most popular subjects of the past year by holding another exhibit of the paintings of the late Eugene artist David McCosh, opening Oct. 4.

Curated by Roger Saydack, the show will include figurative paintings, drawings and lithographs by McCosh, an influential art professor at the UO.

Other shows at the gallery include Ron Graff and Craig Spilman, which opens Tuesday; and works by Margaret Coe, opening Nov. 15.

The White Lotus Gallery, 767 Willamette St., will show "Intuitive Paintings" by Miao Hui-Xin from Sept. 16 to Oct. 22. From Oct. 28 to Nov. 26 the gallery will show 19th and early 20th century Japanese woodblock prints, in conjunction with the Schnitzer exhibit.

LaFollette Gallery, 930 Oak St., will feature the work of Kris Ibach, a Eugene artist who does oil portraits, in October and November. Ibach, a student of Adam Grosowsky, is a past winner of the Mayor's Art Show. In December and January, the gallery will host the sixth annual Benchmark Printmakers' Show, with a dozen or more local artists taking part. …

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Galleries, Museums Look East and West for Fall Exhibitions
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