Roberts Backs Eminent Domain Limits; Recent Ruling Reverts to Legislature

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

Roberts Backs Eminent Domain Limits; Recent Ruling Reverts to Legislature


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Federal Judge John G. Roberts Jr. told senators yesterday that laws restricting the government's power of eminent domain are legitimate, despite a landmark Supreme Court decision earlier this year that broadly expanded that authority.

"The court was not saying, 'You have to have this power, you have to exercise this power,'" Judge Roberts told the Senate Judiciary Committee. "That leaves the ball in the court of the legislature."

Judge Roberts, nominated to be the next chief justice of the Supreme Court, finished a second day of testimony yesterday with a few flare-ups, but no major upsets.

The hearings have been so devoid of fireworks that Senate staffers are having a hard time keeping the limited public seating area filled. There also have not been the major protests that normally accompany Supreme Court confirmation hearings.

Judge Roberts is slated to sit before the committee for a final round of questions this morning at the request of Democrats on the panel.

Yesterday, several Democrats commended the nominee for his performance thus far, but none has indicated that he or she will vote to confirm him. The committee vote is scheduled for next Thursday, and many observers speculate that his nomination will be sent to the full Senate on a straight party-line vote.

"You are one of the best witnesses that, I think, has come before this committee," said Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr., a Delaware Democrat who has been one of the most combative questioners of Judge Roberts.

"If people can't vote for you, then I doubt that they can vote for any Republican nominee," said Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, Utah Republican.

One of the most closely watched Democrats is Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat who voted in favor of Judge Roberts for his position on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. She said she will vote against Judge Roberts for the Supreme Court, however, if she determines that he would overturn Roe v. Wade, the court decision that established federal abortion rights.

She told Judge Roberts that he'd spoken "eloquently" about Roe.

"I learned a lot from listening to you," she said. "You discussed the right to privacy. You were very full and forward-speaking."

Then Mrs. Feinstein inquired whether the White House also had applied an abortion litmus test when it selected Judge Roberts for nomination.

"Has anyone - when you were being interviewed for this position - ever asked your opinion on Roe?" she asked, to which he responded in the negative.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Roberts Backs Eminent Domain Limits; Recent Ruling Reverts to Legislature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.