Classic Rivalries Spread around the Horns; A Different Competition Takes Place at Halftime at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

By Abrams, Alex | The Florida Times Union, September 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

Classic Rivalries Spread around the Horns; A Different Competition Takes Place at Halftime at Historically Black Colleges and Universities


Abrams, Alex, The Florida Times Union


Byline: ALEX ABRAMS

There is no time to wait when it comes to recruiting.

As soon as the Florida Classic between archrivals Florida A&M and Bethune-Cookman College ends in mid-November, Donovan Wells looks at what kind of talent he has returning and determines his most critical needs.

Wells looks for talented players and tries to convince them to play for B-CC instead of another school.

Wells, by the way, is not a football coach. He's the band director.

"It's competitive; it's just like in athletics. We're going after talent," Wells said. "We go out and find the talent that will help out our band."

As Wells knows, being the band director at a historically black college and university (HBCU) can come with as much stress as being the head football coach. Many of the members earn scholarships, and fans of schools such as FAMU, B-CC and Edward Waters College tend to take the halftime shows as seriously as the 30 minutes of football that come before and after it.

Every band tries to outdo the competition with flashier routines, better dance steps and more precise playing. It's a far cry from the generally rigid and traditional performances done by larger, non-HBCU marching bands.

"There is no question about it, there are two contests [at an HBCU game]. One is the football and the other is the band," said Rodney Roberts, a former French horn player in FAMU's Marching 100 and the current interim executive director of the school's booster club.

Roberts saw both sides of that after last season's Florida Classic when a Wildcats fan started boasting about the 58-52 overtime victory. According to Roberts, the fan admitted, "Well, you won the halftime show, but we won the game."

The marching band rivalry will be taken seriously on Saturday at the Willie Gary Classic between EWC and Shaw University at Raines High School.

EWC band director Marques Graham has run his 90-member band through three-hour practices during the last few days to get ready for the annual classic. And, like a coach preparing for a big game, he refuses to divulge any of his game plan for fear that Shaw's band might find out.

"You know, that's a big secret," said Graham, 28, on Tuesday when asked what he had in store for Saturday's halftime show. All he would say is that EWC's dance team -- the Purple Thunder -- "might" perform.

A year ago, EWC's band carried three closed caskets onto the field at Alltel Stadium -- where the annual classic was played -- for its halftime performance. At a certain point, three drum majors emerged from the caskets and started dancing to the roar of the crowd.

"We were being kind of sarcastic, that Shaw's band had gotten so good over the years that our drum majors had literally worked themselves to death to get better," said Graham, a Jacksonville native.

Talking trash is as much a part of an HBCU band performance as the colorful costumes, current playlists and over-the-top dancing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Classic Rivalries Spread around the Horns; A Different Competition Takes Place at Halftime at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.