Ghetto Britain; We're Sleepwalking Our Way to Segregation, Warns Race Chief

Daily Mail (London), September 19, 2005 | Go to article overview

Ghetto Britain; We're Sleepwalking Our Way to Segregation, Warns Race Chief


Byline: CHARLOTTE GILL

BRITAIN is becoming a racially segregated nation with ethnic minorities living in 'ghettos' cut off from the rest of society, the country's race relations chief will warn this week.

Trevor Phillips is to say that some ethnic enclaves have become 'literal black holes into which nobody goes without fear and trepidation and nobody escapes undamaged'.

In an apocalyptic speech, the chairman of the Commission for Racial Equality will criticise the Government's race relations policy for promoting acceptance of difference rather than upholding British values.

Such multicultural tolerance has ultimately helped to build 'fully-fledged ghettos', he will tell the Manchester Council for Community Relations on Thursday.

'We have allowed tolerance of diversity to harden into the effective isolation of communities in which some people think separate values ought to apply,' he will say.

Assessing the UK following the July 7 London bomb attacks, he warns: 'We are sleepwalking our way to segregation.

'We are becoming strangers to each other and leaving communities to be marooned outside the mainstream.' The remarks will fuel the debate over whether Labour's open-door immigration policy, which is swelling the population by 150,000 every year, is to blame for the increased segregation.

Critics argue the scale of migration is too great for new arrivals properly to integrate into society and must be slowed.

In the speech, Mr Phillips will call for drastic action to encourage integration, including forcing 'white' schools to take larger numbers of ethnic minorities.

He concedes some will regard his suggestions as social engineering - but says he sees them as a solution to segregation and potential conflict. 'The fragmentation of our society by race and ethnicity is a catastrophe for us all,' he will say.

'The fact is we are a society which, almost without noticing it, is becoming more divided by race and religion.

'We are becoming more unequal by ethnicity.

'We need a kind of integration that binds us together without stifling us.

We need to create a nation of many colours which combine to create a single rainbow.' Controversially, Mr Phillips will claim Britain is heading towards American-style racial segregation with Muslim and black ghettos splitting cities.

In New Orleans, for example, economic and racial divisions were laid bare when Hurricane Katrina hit, causing particular devastation in poorer areas. …

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