Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Aviation Insights: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Millions of People: Millions of People Fly from City to City or from Nation to Nation and across the Oceans and around the World Effortlessly and Economically

By Deal, Walter F.,, III | The Technology Teacher, September 2005 | Go to article overview

Aviation Insights: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Millions of People: Millions of People Fly from City to City or from Nation to Nation and across the Oceans and around the World Effortlessly and Economically


Deal, Walter F.,, III, The Technology Teacher


Introduction

If you can imagine thousands of years ago, early humans walked on the earth and probably looked toward the skies, watching birds soar effortlessly and thinking, "... if only I could fly!" Aviation as we know it today is a mature but very young technology as time goes. Considering that the 100th anniversary of flight was celebrated just a few years ago in 2003, millions of people fly from city to city or from nation to nation and across the oceans and around the world effortlessly and economically. Additionally, we have space travel that has taken us beyond our atmosphere to the moon and Mars and beyond.

As we look at aviation, we generally think in terms of airlines and passenger travel. However, there are many other applications of aircraft beyond carrying passengers. Aircraft are used for transporting packaged goods, mail, foods, medical supplies, and other materials. But there are other applications that aircraft are used for, such as observation, mapping, weather, and reconnaissance missions. Some aircraft are piloted, and others are remotely controlled and are called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs. Here we will focus on the highlights of unmanned aerial vehicles.

It is important to realize that the invention and development of flight and flying machines represent the accumulation of much knowledge by many people over many years. To put things into perspective, it was about the time of the Wright brothers' early flights in 1903 that we saw the introduction of the automobile, large scale use of trains, steam-powered ships, and the introduction of wireless radio technology. In other words, there was a revolution in technology--the way that we travel and communicate--right before our eyes!

During the early years of flight and flying, tinkerers, inventors, engineers, and scientists tried many different types of experimental designs and aircraft in attempts to fly. During the first part of the twentieth century there was significant interest in flying and flying machines. According to some, the early years of flight could be characterized as an art and science because there are many scientific laws and principles that govern flight, and flying was an "art" in the sense that the flyer needed to understand the aircraft. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, the owners of a successful bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio, became interested in flying and flying machines in 1896 after reading about the death of Otto Lilienthal. Lilienthal was quite prominent in influencing the Wright brothers to pursue their interests in aviation. Accordingly, they were avid readers about the latest developments in flight and methodically taught themselves everything to know about flying at the time. Lilienthal was a significant player in the development of flight, as it was through his efforts that the perception of flight and flying was more than a pastime for fools and tinkerers. Although his designs had flaws, Lilienthal had an immense influence on aviation. His writings were translated and distributed worldwide, and the photographs that documented his flights visually proved that a human could launch himself into the air and stay aloft. He demonstrated the importance of identifying the principles that governed an experiment before proceeding, and his meticulous documentation of his research provided guidance for those who came after him.

The Wright brothers wrote to Octave Chanute and Samuel Langley at the Smithsonian Institution regarding developments in flight and flying. It is important to note that the interest in flight and flying was an international interest, as there were many people in Europe constructing flying machines and experimenting with the principles of flight. Several historical individuals were Leonardo Da Vinci, the inventor of the ornithopter; Daniel Bernoulli, a Swiss scientist noted for his discoveries of the mathematical relationship of fluids flowing along a surface such as an airfoil; Sir George Cayley, who realized that the propulsion system of an airplane should generate thrust, and the wings should be shaped so as to create lift.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Aviation Insights: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Millions of People: Millions of People Fly from City to City or from Nation to Nation and across the Oceans and around the World Effortlessly and Economically
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.